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if i don't talk about this with someone im going to explode.
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uthervoggen972 posted:
okay i will do my best to keep it short.

i had 2 risk events back in june. i was with two different guys, unfortunately. the first guy (he was receptive.) that i was with, performed unprotected intercourse. he insisted and said he was clean... during the time with the second guy (i was receptive) the condom ended up breaking but he is hiv-. i recieved a call from a health clinic explaining that i may be hiv positive. i asked the first guy and he said he had just found out he was positive. i was treated for gonnorea and chlamydia a week after being with the first guy. after the treatment and 10 days of no sex i was with the second guy. between then and now ive had insane symptoms. tingling arms/fingers. headaches. diarreah. body aches. a sore on my groin area. i dont know if im being paranoid or if these were valid symptoms. i feel fine now. (minus the bump/sore on groin)

at six weeks i took an oraquick test and it tested negative. i am worried that in 6 weeks time my results may not be favor. since ive recieved chlamydia and gonnorea from the hiv+ partner, arent my chances of ontracting hiv greater?? im worried, and needless to say i have already changed my views on my sexual behavior. ive warned my second partner as well. he's more curious about the 3 month mark. so far he hasn't shown signs of the sti's.

any advice ar suggestions would be greatly appreciated!! thanks!
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georgiagail responded:
"since I've received chlamydia and gonorrhea from the HIV positive partner, aren't my chances of contracting HIV greater?"

No.

In fact, your six week OraQuick test result indicates that it is quite likely you are NOT HIV positive.

An HIV screening test done four weeks after a possible exposure is considered to be 95 percent accurate; that is, 95 percent of newly infected folks will have enough antibodies present to test "reactive" (i.e., positive) by one month (actually 25 days) after this exposure.

By 90 days this percentage has increased to 99.99 percent.

A six week test falls somewhere in between these two statistics.

Thus, the odds are incredibly in your FAVOR that your three month test result will be the same as the six week one was; HIV negative.

Good luck and let us know these results.

Gail
 
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uthervoggen972 replied to georgiagail's response:
Thank you SO much for the reply. I really do appreciate it. I took the test at day 40 (for the first partner) day 34 for the second. I feel much more confident now, and my symptoms have all disappeared just since reading your reply. It's silly to think that i've been stressing myself into having false symptoms for the past two weeks! I was considering picking up another test for day 50. Then a final blood test at 90-100.

I've never been one that was "addicted" to sex, needless to say I will change my habits, and I consider myself a newfound celibate virgin after this!! This has been an incredibly scary experience. I've taken off work, I haven't been able to eat or sleep... or even drink. I've been afraid to do anything! I now feel as though theres at LEAST a ray of sunshine...

Waking up and finding out that you've had unprotected sex with someone thats HIV Positive is not the best feeling... I am still cautious, but very optimistic now. You grow up learning that "if you have sex with someone HIV Positive, you're automatically going to get infected." This way of thinking nearly led me to a ledge. Thank you again Gail. Regardless of what my future results are, you've most definitely changed my entire point of view about this entire situation.
 
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georgiagail replied to uthervoggen972's response:
Perhaps this might also help ease your concerns...

The statistics we use for ESTIMATED risk from unprotected intercourse for receptive (that's you) penile-vaginal intercourse is 10 per 10,000 exposures with a source known to carry the virus.

So it is, luckily, not a given that someone who has unprotected sexual contact with an HIV positive person will automatically become HIV positive themselves.

As scary as this virus is, it is also one of the most difficult ones to pass on to someone else. In order for transmission to occur, the virus must, somehow, be able to enter the body of the uninfected person. In terms of vaginal intercourse, this typically requires that the vaginal membranes are irritated/damaged during the intercourse (through dryness or rough thrusting) to the point where there is easy access to the bloodstream.

Gail

Gail
 
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uthervoggen972 replied to georgiagail's response:
recieved a call from the clinic today (the one that told me about the risk initially.) she told me that the in home oraquick test wasnt "valid" and that i should come in to be tested. she said that user error may produce an invalid result. i was under the impression that if the C line shows up, it was fine. im not scared, but more confused if anything....
 
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georgiagail replied to uthervoggen972's response:
?User error? The OraQuick is designed to be pretty "dummy proof". I mean honestly, how can on really mess up following such simple directions?

Gail
 
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uthervoggen972 replied to georgiagail's response:
was thinking the exact same thing. my partner assumed that i was hiv and that i gave it to him....i personally dont think thats the case. i think he's had it for a while and just didnt know. he probably told the lady from the clinic and she's treating the situation with preconcieved ideas. thats what im gathering from the conversation that took place. i told her that im waiting until the 3 month mark to re-test and she made it sound as if that was unheard of.
 
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uthervoggen972 replied to georgiagail's response:
just a small update. I woke up today finding a second genital wart. I was never diagnosed with Herpes, Ive had these sores before. Maybe once or twice a year since 2010. I'm not sure what they are, but the fact that they're showing up now has me questioning my results. I've never had these sores on my face or any other part of my body. just around genitals/anus.
 
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georgiagail replied to uthervoggen972's response:
Are you confusing genital warts (HPV) with herpes (HSV)? These are two different viruses.

Both these viruses are FAR, FAR more common that HIV. They require only skin to skin contact for transmission.

The fact that you have HPV (or HSV) has no relation to having HIV.

Gail
 
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uthervoggen972 replied to georgiagail's response:
Perhaps, as I've never even heard of HPV lol. honestly, I've had these genital warts since I was a virgin. That makes perfect sense, but It's been a long time since I've had an out break. So once again, I have no reason to relate this to HIV? I trust what you're telling me lol but you must admit that the timing for this random outbreak couldn't be any worse haha
 
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georgiagail replied to uthervoggen972's response:
If you have warts (any warts; not just genital warts) they are caused by the virus that goes by the description of HPV. There are many different strains of this virus, although most folks are focused on the ones that involve the cervix since, in some women, the presence of HPV can develop into cervical cancer.

And no, the fact one has HPV is totally unrelated to HIV.

Here is a good article that described HPV and warts...

http://www.medicinenet.com/warts_common_warts/article.htm#wart_facts


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