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HIV risk is driving me crazy
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fernandesrc91 posted:
Here's what happened: I met a girl that had a lot of parters. I had oral contact with her groin (not actually the vagina, just the region where the pubic hair are). I didn't use condom, but there was no kind of fluids yet (The region was dry). There was no penetration either. I had oral contact with her breast too, but that was all.

By the way, she told me that she had not HIV, and she was very confidant when she said that. But, who knows?

I went to the doctor and she putted me on PEP, even though she said that the infection risk is very low in that case. Now I am like:

I had unprotect oral contact with her pubic hair area, right, but could be enough fluids there to infect someone? Then I think: "there was no fluids yet, she was dry!" and then I red that HIV don't survive for a long time outside the human body, so if there was no penetration (orally), how could I be infected? Then I think: "I may have some small wounds on my mouth" and I come back from the top, you know?

Could you guys help me on that? There is actually a possibility of infection in that case? or is it just a silly fear? See, I was already a paranoic person. And now I just can't calm down. There is always that "what if?" that keep coming back to me all the time. It's like my "automatic mode" was turned on.
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georgiagail responded:
I have absolutely no idea why you were put on PEP in the first place (well I do; many physicians are quite ignorant in regards to HIV risk).

Let me explain it this way....

The estimated risk from unprotected "real" oral sex (i.e., mouth to vagina in your case) ranges from .5 to 1 per 10,000 exposures with a source KNOWN to carry the virus.

Yep....5 to 1 per 10,000 exposures with actual oral sex and an HIV positive partner.

In this case...

1. You never came in actual contact with the "nether" regions (the pubic area doesn't count).

2. You have no actual idea of this persons status.

3. "Small wounds in the mouth" don't count. One would need open, bleeding wounds AND need to come in contact with either sexual fluids or blood of a positive individual for there to be even the risk of transmission. Neither of which took place here.

In summary...quit worrying about this.

Gail
 
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fernandesrc91 replied to georgiagail's response:
Sorry my lack of knowledge. I told that I had contact with her breast too, right? I found out that breast milk is a way that people can contract HIV. I mean, I don't remember any fluids coming out of her nipples, I sucked a little bit hard but I don't remember any taste..But If there was milk, would I fell any taste?
 
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georgiagail replied to fernandesrc91's response:
This woman wasn't producing breast milk. This would be hard to miss tasting breast milk and a woman doesn't produce it unless she's been pregnant and recently delivered. In addition, the only ones are risk from breast milk from HIV positive mothers are infants who 1. have under developed immune systems and 2. consume ALOT of breast milk when they are breast feeding.

Gail
 
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fernandesrc91 replied to georgiagail's response:
Hi. Sorry for taking too long for response, Thanks for your reply. So, could I say in that case: no fluids, no infection?" I was afraid that my lips accidentally touched her vulva and some vaginal fluid got into any small wound in my mouth or lips. But I am pretty sure that was no fluids at all. I did not see any fluids and did not feel any taste either . Considering that, was I overreacting about get HIV all this time?
 
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fernandesrc91 replied to georgiagail's response:
About PEP, she actually told me that my risk is near of zero, but she was like: better safe than sorry. Maybe she thought that I was lying or hiding something (But I was not!). I told her exactly what I told you. But anyway, I am still on PEP. It's my last week. I don't know if I need testing. I am kinda getting over it day by day.


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