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Possible HIV transmission through blood
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foreveraggie posted:
Hello. My family and I visited and stayed with a person last summer who has AIDs. They have had it for years, but are obviously on meds and doing fine. Supposed undetectable viral load. My concern is that this individual had two huge scrape/scabs on their legs. We caught them picking at them a few times. My wife did say she saw blood under the scab surface. Our 7 year old had a bloody nose and a tiny pin prick cut in his ear. If infected person picked his scab with blood on it, and then touched say the xbox remote and then our child immediately grabbed that remote and then stuck there finger in their bleeding nose, could they be at risk of acquiring HIV? I have asked on other sites and have been told no risk, but when reading about the virus, I find out that it could happen. Can someone please shed some light on this for me? Approximately 7.5 weeks after possible exposure, my son got sick with headache,, which he never complains of, sore throat, and just not feeling good. I caught something very similar the next few days, so my fears subsided some. Then the next week he got like bumps on his lower legs that my wife said were bug bites. Went away in a few days. Fast forward 10 months, and he to a rash that started on his upper chest and neck and then moved to his back. Lasted 5 days. Two months later, he had a few canker sores on inner lower lip. Went away in less than a week. Does this mean anything? Am I just freaking out over nothing? Other than an occasional light colored bowel, he seems fine. Thank you please for responding.
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georgiagail responded:
Stop the "what ifs" and attempting to diagnose HIV by symptoms.

None of your sons symptoms have anything to do with HIV.

If you remain concerned, consider doing a home test with him (i.e., the OraQuick test is easily available in most drug stores) but this would be only to ease your concerns and not for any real risk issue.

Gail
 
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foreveraggie replied to georgiagail's response:
Gail, Thank you. My wife issued a Oraquick test for my fears. It was negative. This was in late April after they got back from vacation. I worry that the test was not accurate. Are you saying that there was 0 risk that my child was exposed?
 
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foreveraggie replied to foreveraggie's response:
Gail, I am not trying to play what if!!! They shared an Xbox remote and that is what I keep thinking about... I read everywhere that in order for transmission to occur, there needs to be "copious" amount of blood going from infected individuals deep wound into another's open and deep wound. Is that the case? If so, then how can you explain individuals getting infected from an HIV individuals bleeding gums??? I am certain that the infected individual does not have a mouthful of blood while kissing their partner! Can you please help me understand the difference. Thanks.
 
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georgiagail replied to foreveraggie's response:
A test done at least one month after a possible exposure (and your initial posting does not indicate any of this ACTUALLY happened, thus the "what if" scenario) is considered to be 95 percent accurate; that is, 95 percent of newly infected folks will have enough antibodies present to be picked up by current testing methods.

By three months these tests results are 99.99 percent accurate.

You indicate the headache your son reported came 7.5 weeks later. If testing took place then, the accuracy of the results would be somewhere between these two percentages.

If you still have difficulty accepting the accuracy of the test result, you can always retest.

Gail
 
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georgiagail replied to foreveraggie's response:
In truth, there's only been one reported case of an individual become exposed from kissing an HIV positive individual with bleeding gums and this person also had terrible gum disease themselves. Transmission was through the lip locking (i.e., deep french kissing).

In order for transmission to take place there must not only be significant LIQUID fluids (i.e., sexual, blood) of an infected individual but also an open (i.e., bleeding) source into the uninfected individuals body. In addition, HIV is an extremely delicate virus outside the body, typically dying within seconds outside the confines of the human environment. Thus, even if the HIV positive person touched the xbox remote AND his hand contained a small amount of blood any virus in the blood would be dead within seconds of leaving the body.

Gail
 
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foreveraggie replied to georgiagail's response:
Tested at 10 months post possible exposure. Oraquick in home test administered by my wife.
 
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georgiagail replied to foreveraggie's response:
Ten months...then stop worrying about this.

Testing has clearly shown that your son is HIV negative.

Gail
 
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foreveraggie replied to georgiagail's response:
Gail, I always think worst case scenario, that is why I question and you call it the what ifs! We stayed 3 nights with them. I have been around them for years and never worried. But because my son was now present, and I saw the huge scabs and them picking at them, I worry! So, if you are saying there is NO chance of him being infected, I guess I need to take a chill pill!
 
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foreveraggie replied to foreveraggie's response:
So, even without having the negative test, you would call this a none risk?
 
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georgiagail replied to foreveraggie's response:
Look; your son was tested 10 months post what you believe was an exposure.

Any test done 3 months after a potential exposure is considered to both definitive and conclusive in its results.

The test result was negative. You need to believe this test result. Your son did not become HIV positive from this person.

Gail
 
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foreveraggie replied to georgiagail's response:
I know, and thank you. I have a few questions that I need some clarification on. First, was my sons possible exposure a 'True' exposure? Second, is the OraQuick in home anti-body test 100% accurate if properly performed? I would like to believe my wife did it correctly. Third, why does everyone state that HIV begins to die as soon as it leaves the body? If this is true, then how are blood draw tests accurate as many clinics and doctor offices send their samples out to other labs for clinical testing? Wouldn't the virus in the vial of blood have died from waiting 2 to 3 days to be tested? Something about this doesn't seem right... Can you please she'd some light on this? Thank you...
 
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georgiagail replied to foreveraggie's response:
1. Doubtful

2. Yes. The OraQuick is FDA approved for home testing. It's designed to be easy to use.

3. The samples that are sent out to labs are not tested for the actual presence of the virus (and neither does the OraQuick). HIV screening tests for the presence of antibodies the immune system begins to produce after transmission has taken place. No antibodies means no infection.

Gail
 
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foreveraggie replied to georgiagail's response:
Thank you!!! What is "Doubtful" suppose to mean? So I should quit worrying???
 
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georgiagail replied to foreveraggie's response:
Yes; I have been trying to tell you for several postings now that you should quit worrying.

Why are you having trouble believing the OraQuick test results? This is an easy test to administer. It was designed to be so. When the directions are followed, the results are quite accurate. Your son was tested 10 months after what you believe was an exposure. If he was infected from this, his body would have been producing antibodies to the virus and there is no doubt that the test result would have been "positive".

The test results were negative. He did not have the specific antibodies connected with this virus. He is not infected with HIV. It is time to stop worrying that he is.

Gail


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