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the window period is not clear.....
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An_253243 posted:
I am looking for someone that has knowledge when it comes to hiv. Some sites say three months others say six. Then to make it more confusing some sites say it depends on the test. How can something so important be so misunderstood.

See if you can judge my status off of my tests please....
1. 50 post possible exposure had a RNA by PCR test done. Result was non- reactive.
2. 88 Post exposure had a third generation antibody test. Result was non-reactive.
3. 4 &4.5 month post took oraquick test with negative results.
4. 5 months post exposure had a finger prick rapid test results were negative.

Do I have to test at six months? Does my RNA test do anything for my status?

Symptoms: neuropathy in both thighs and arms. Started around month two post exposure. My neurologist thinks its due to vitamin d deficiency. But my levels are up and the pain continues. Its so mad i cant wear jeans anymore. If anything touches my skin I want to scream.

Now I know you can not diagnosis hiv off of symptoms, but this is really scary! Is neuropathy a symptom in early hiv infection.
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georgiagail responded:
The recommended time period for testing is 3 months.

And no, you do not have to test at six months, although I suspect you will.

And no, neuropathy is not a symptom of early HIV infection.

Gail
 
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An_253243 replied to georgiagail's response:
Thanks for your response but I have more questions. Its three months really???? Or is 97% at three months?

I did more searching over the window period, and some sites say six months for hiv 2 or if someone has an immune problem such a lupus. Is this true?

Three months is conclusive no matter which test is used?

Neuropathy usually occurs in late hiv or due to meds?

I just need insight, not everything online is true.
 
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georgiagail replied to An_253243's response:
It is 99.99 percent at 3 months.

The very small percentage who may need to wait for 6 month testing are those whose immune systems have already been damaged by other, severe medical issues. For example, someone who has recently undergone chemotherapy or someone who has undergone an organ transplant and who is on immune suppressing medication to prevent their body from rejecting the transplanted organ.

The wait period is due to the health of the immune system, not the virus itself. HIV screening typically checks for antibodies the immune system begins to crank out when it becomes aware that a foreign substance (in this case, the virus) has invaded the body.

If we see neuropathy in HIV (and, of course, not every patient with HIV develops this) it will be seen later in the disease process.

Gail
 
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An_253243 replied to georgiagail's response:
Wow its really 99%... Here's my situation and if you could pls suggest what I should do.

As you already know I took my last test at five months via finger prick rapid test at a health clinic. They said it would not be conclusive until the sixth month. But there's a twist to my story. The man I had unprotected sex with took an oraquick test in front of me at 4 months after we had sex, his test was negative.
Now my question is am I being ridiculous to worry?
Because if he tested negative at 4 months and I tested negative at 50 days with an rna and negative at five months with rapid, didnt I cover everything? What are the odds of both are tests being wrong? Just tell me straight forward if im going crazy.
 
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georgiagail replied to An_253243's response:
The Oraquick test IS an FDA approved test for HIV. It is simple to use (designed that way) and fool proof.

Your partner took the test four months after your unprotected sexual encounter with him and tested negative.

Thus, he does not have the virus to pass onto you.

You have also tested negative up to five months out.

The odds that ALL these tests are wrong is zero.

You probably are going crazy. But you're going crazy with worry over a disease that you don't have and that testing has clearly shown you don't have.

What should you do?

Put this fear behind you and get on with your life.

Gail
 
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patjjjj replied to An_253243's response:
From what I've heard Peripheral Neuropathy is a side effect of HIV meds.
 
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georgiagail replied to patjjjj's response:
There are a wide variety of HIV medications that can be used. Not all of them cause peripheral neuropathy and not everyone who is on them develops this.

Gail
 
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An_253243 replied to georgiagail's response:
Ok - so I dont have hiv. You are 100% sure? Could my neuropathy be caused from a vitamin d deficiency ?
 
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georgiagail replied to An_253243's response:
You've already written that your Neurologist believes it is.

Gail
 
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An_253243 replied to georgiagail's response:
Well I don't believe it is possible. I can't find any info that links low vit d to neuropathy. And I can't stop connecting the neuropathy to hiv. I'm going to a therapist in a few days. Hopefully i can overcome this fear.

I just keep telling myself over & over I tested negative at five months and he tested negative at four months.

U are all i have to talk to pls continue to help me.
 
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georgiagail replied to An_253243's response:
I cannot tell you if what you feel is due to a vitamin D deficiency but it is NOT due to HIV.

Both you and your partner have tested negative to this virus. He cannot pass something on to you that he does not have.

Gail
 
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An_253243 replied to georgiagail's response:
Gail,
I'm freaking out!!!!!! I googled hiv neuropathy. I should have never done that! It said it starts in the toes. Mine started in my thighs. So it can't be related to hiv right? Furthermore like you said I didn't have an exposure.

I'm seeing a therapist tomorrow I don't know what or who to believe. You say three months is conclusive , but why does the cdc say six?
 
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georgiagail replied to An_253243's response:
1. Stop reading about HIV Neuropathies

2. Focus on the fact that both you and your partner have tested negative for this virus.

3. See your therapist today.

4. Remember the CDC is an extremely conservative group. Even so, for god sake, you tested negative at FIVE MONTHS! Do you really believe your status would change by the sixth month???

Gail
 
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An_253243 replied to georgiagail's response:
No, I guess my status wont change in a month. Unfortunately my therapy appointment is tomorrow, not today. But I am going! I just keep thinking crazy thoughts. This hiv scare has me completely STRESSED out! I keep thinking maybe his oraquick test was wrong. But then a rational side of my brain kicks in and says "but yours was also negative at 5 months". Its like I am in a battle with myself. I tell you what I would make the best jury candidate. I need all the facts. So far I have learned from you and the internet is most will test positive 25 after exposure. 97% will test positive by three months and in rare cases it can take out to six months. Oh and every symptom is an hiv symptom. So you can rely on symptoms! I am trying to be rational and think how could we both test negative after three months, even if Oraquick is not the best hiv test. Anyway I will let you know how therapy goes tomorrow.


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