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bp moniotr
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abc1234wxyz posted:
Hello:
Would you please tell me which is more accurate: The digital bp monitor (home device sold at super market) for home used or the one at DR. offices.
I get a wide difference numbers: ex. Digital monitor: 160/89 but the one in dr office showed 138/82.

why are they differences?

Has any body hhad the same experience as I had?
which one should we trust?
Thanks
abc1234wxyz
Reply
 
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billh99 responded:
The both may be accurate.

But the one in the doctors office calibration is checked from time to time.

And if your heart rate is irregular that can cause the home BP to have errors.

But there are any number of things that can cause BP to be different.

A common on is called white coat hypertension where the BP is high in the office, but otherwise lower.

And the opposite where it is lower in the office. That is called masked hypertension.

The first thing is to make an appointment with the nurse and bring you machine. Then you can verify that you are using it correctly and that it agrees with the office.

If that does not show a problem then asks the doctor for a 24Hr ambulatory blood pressure monitor test.

That gives you the most accurate information what the BP is Really doing.
 
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derfberger replied to billh99's response:
exact same thing happened to me. i have an Omron--highly rated in Consumer Reports. I calebrated it with Dr office as it was reading high. My Dr didn't have much use for them. Yet another Internist suggested getting one. When i was getting some lab work done stepped into the E r and asked if some one would check. They used a digital monitor. so digital for me is more accurate. Some swear by the cuff and stethiscope but then you have to have some one else learn to use it and not for hard of hearing.

I sent the Omron back and they returned it saying checked out. They said you have to be seated, feet flat on floor, and no activity a few minutes before taking. The arrow as to be pricisely lined up over the artery.

Been O k since then, I take it into Walgreens occasionally and calibrate it with the pharmacist's
 
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derfberger replied to billh99's response:
B T W my dr wanted to do an ambulatory test and couldn't find a machine. Asked around to the various Cardio offices--nothing. Seems the general concensus is that they aren't very accurate
 
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billh99 replied to derfberger's response:
Been O k since then, I take it into Walgreens occasionally and calibrate it with the pharmacist's

Thanks for that suggestion. The pharmacists are a good and available resource for verifying the BP meters.

But the note that the automated "chair machines" may or may not be accurately calibrated.

They used a digital monitor. so digital for me is more accurate.

The clinical BP machines use a much more sophisticated algorithm then the home machines. When I was in the urologist their machine took about 3 minutes cycling up and down because I have a low heart rate. My home machine does not make those adjustments.

I sent the Omron back and they returned it saying checked out. They said you have to be seated, feet flat on floor, and no activity a few minutes before taking. The arrow as to be pricisely lined up over the artery.

The same is true in the doctors office. But most often you are rushed in to the exam room and are on an exam table without either a foot rest or back support. Another requirement is that the arm should be at heart level. A good nurse/doctor will hold you arm at that level when taking your BP. But not always.
 
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billh99 replied to derfberger's response:
That is interesting. As I understand it the British have now made a 24 hr ambulatory test before diagnosing hypertension.


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