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Medications for 28 year old male diagnosed with high BP
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nicholasprady posted:
Hi,

I'm a 28 yr old Caucasian male - 5'9'' and 186 lbs (BMI 28.3) - diagnosed of high BP (avg. ~150/95). I eat a healthy diet rich in fiber, low in cholesterol and salt with conscious doses of potassium. My cholesterol, thyroid levels, iron etc. are perfect. However, my BP hasn't decreased with that. About 10 days ago, I started taking 100mg CoQ and 1g garlic/day and doing Isometric Hand Training and am still waiting for the effects to kick in. However, I'd like to know my different medication options, just in case I have to resort to them.

I read that some medications - diuretics and beta blockers - cause erectile dysfunction and am very concerned about that since I still have to start a family (I'm married). I also read that thiazide diuretics, which are the first line of drugs, can cause diabetes. Some medications (Clonidine and Propranolol) spike the BP even higher if you stop taking them.


So I wonder what should I expect going into the doctor's room? What medications would be generally recommended? Is there a specific beginner's treatment regime or some additional tests that I should enquire about? How would medications affect my future life? I'm primarily concerned about the ED part and diabetes, and any suggestions regarding those would help.


Also, a naive question. Instead of diuretics, would it work if I simply drank more water and peed more?

Thanks
Reply
 
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billh99 responded:
Beta blockers have been a long time standby for treating high BP.

However, current studies have shown that they are not the best option unless one also has heat problems or if other BP meds have not worked.

However, some doctors still prescribe beta blockers as their first choice.

However the literature suggest and a diuretic and/or ACEinhibtor/ABR/Calcium channel blocker should be the first choice.

So I wonder what should I expect going into the doctor's room? What medications would be generally recommended? Is there a specific beginner's treatment regime or some additional tests that I should enquire about? How would medications affect my future life? I'm primarily concerned about the ED part and diabetes, and any suggestions regarding those would help.

Most case of high BP is "essential". That is no know causes. And it appears that you have recently had normal series of blood test so no other tests are used unless you have other symptoms or don't react to the BP meds.

I like looking up meds on RXlist.

http://www.rxlist.com/drugs/alpha_a.htm

Here is what it says about diabetes;
Diabetes and Hypoglycemia: Latent diabetes mellitus may become manifest and diabetic patients given thiazides may require adjustment of their insulin dose.

Not that it cause it, but can bring it out. But discuss your concern with your doctor (and about ED) specially if you have a family history of diabetes or if you blood glucose is in the higher end of normal.

But many people are on these meds without significant problems. And if you do have a side effect discuss it with your doctor about switching meds.

However, there are two things that you can do to reduce BP.

One is to reduce weight. Even 10-20 lbs lose can make a significant difference.

And you did not mention exercise other than the hand exercise.

Aerobic exercise is good for reducing BP. Also strength exercises done with motion (not static) are helpful.
 
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nicholasprady replied to billh99's response:
@BillH99. Thanks for your reply. I try to run for 2 miles atleast 3-4 times a week. But I'm going to double down on exercises and losing 10 lbs now.


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