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shingles and high blood pressure
honorabledad posted:
I would like to know if anyone knows if shingles causes high blood pressure? Nov. 21st went to a doctor for suspected shingles and blood pressure was 250 over 130. Was placed in hospital for 5 days and have had high blood pressure ever since, for over two months. doctor keeps changing bp medication. but blood pressure spikes sometimes in the middle of night up to 190 over 110. is there a better bp medication for this and how long is this going to last. thanks
billh99 responded:
No medical professional normally responds in this forum.

Pain and discomfort can certainly cause increases in BP.

But the amount you reported is extreme.

But my understanding is that in shingles the virus infects nerves. In your case maybe it has gotten into one of the nerves involved in blood pressure control.

You might want to look for specialist at a medical school.
kjme11374 responded:
I have no medical knowledge, but from personal experience, I'd guess that it is partially due to stress. That High a BP is serious and you should be talking to your doctor IMMEDIATELY and not posting on this board.

Do you monitor your own BP at home (that is, do you have a BP machine and take BP at least twice a day)?

I know that one particular BP med has a known side effect of a serious cough - I had that med and it is NOT pleasant......

I've had a couple of incidents of ridiculously high BP (not as high as yours, but with a corresponding High HR). THen in Nov 2011 I had VERY high Systolic numbers but the rest was borderline (HR was ok). In My particular case, we believe it was due to stress.

Call your doctor and see him right away. Bring your blood pressure record. Let us know what happens.
gpe_urias replied to kjme11374's response:
It is really interesting how can we use technology to help us with medical issues.

Now hypertension is a really big issue, and some people dont even know or dont even monitor their blood pressure.

For example, i ve found this app bracelet that helps you to measure your blood pressure from a bracelet that sends signals toy your mobile phone and you can see (very easily) your blood pressure.

Check it out!
undefined responded:
I've been trying to discover a link between bp meds and shingles. One med, lysinopril, actually mentions "blistering skin disease"as a side effect. I've struggled with high bp and kidney failure for years and finally started home dialysis. I had a serious setback when I had the surgery, from the an aesthetic and shortly after that developed stinging pain in my back that shot straight through my chest but with all I was going through it was hard to tell the cause until I broke out. No surprise due to age and level of debility, but my daughter feels I got muchh sicker with each med they put me on. In answer to your question that intense a level of chronic pain would have to affect bp levels. My doc says it does. I wonder if your night spikes, like mine came down during day so the high bp was missed until the shingles onset which of course would raise your levels all day.
herblife responded:
I suggest that you do not eat salt or anything containing salt. My blood pressure has become normal because I keep a 400 mg maximum daily intake, I take Evening Primrose Oil and L-Arginine daily and drink an herbal tea of my own invention. Any large quantities of salt and it will spike back up to the danger zone so for me, in a way it's poisonous.
foxyminx23 responded:
have you ever been checked for heart issues? You may have too fast a heartbeat, SVT or other arrhythmia.

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