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Prehypertension linked to increased stroke risk
billh99 posted:
Prehypertension independently raises the risk of stroke by about 50%, according to results of a new review [1 >.

Prehypertension is defined by a systolic blood pressure (BP) between 120 and 139 mm Hg or diastolic BP between 80 and 89 mm Hg. "Importantly," the authors say, the risk of stroke appeared more strongly driven by higher systolic or diastolic BP values within the prehypertensive range. It's appropriate to "recommend and monitor therapeutic lifestyle changes" in patients who have BP that falls within the higher range of prehypertension, that is systolic BP (SBP) 130-139 mm Hg or diastolic BP (DBP) 85-89 mm Hg, author Dr Bruce Ovbiagele (University of California, San Diego), said in an interview.
These lifestyle changes, he noted, could include a low-salt diet, consuming no more than 2 g of sodium per day, regular exercise consisting of 30 minutes of aerobic exercise at least four days a week, and maintaining a normal body-mass index between 18.5 and 24.9 kg/m2.

"So far," Ovbiagele noted, "no randomized studies have shown that therapeutic lifestyle changes will specifically reduce the risk of incident hypertension or avert stroke in patients with prehypertension." Nonetheless, these lifestyle approaches "do lower blood pressure modestly, are relatively safe, and will likely enhance global vascular risk reduction."
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