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Genetic defect
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Guennie posted:
Hello. I am 39 years old, about to turn 40 in February, and I am hoping it isn't too late to have a successful pregnancy.

At age 18 I found out I was pregnant after I had received a measles vaccine for college. I became very sick and was advised there would be serious problems with the baby, so I had an abortion. After the procedure I had blood clots and they had to go back in and remove them. A year later I became pregnant after missing a few doses of the pill, and I had a natural miscarriage around six weeks. I went to the emergency room after the bleeding hadn't stopped for two weeks and they said I had developed an infection and put me on antibiotics.

I remained on the pill my entire life until a couple of years ago and my periods were like clockwork. After deciding to go off the pill I didn't have any problems. (I was single, no risk of pregnancy.) Last year I got married and became pregnant. I developed a horrible migraine (never had one before, never even get headaches) and before I could get in to see a doctor I woke up in the night with bleeding and ended up in the emergency room. Found out I had been carrying twins and had lost one at about five weeks, but they said the other looked good. I had an appointment with an OB/GYN the next week and when he did the ultrasound I had lost the other one as well. I had to have a D&C and afterwards I had to go through a steroid treatment to get rid of the migraine, then I had to go on the pill for a couple of months because I kept bleeding.

In March of this year I again found out I was pregnant. But I was diagnosed with a blighted ovum. I waited four months trying to miscarry naturally, tried the medicine to induce but it didn't work, then had to have another D&C. My Dr. ran some tests and discovered I have a genetic defect in both MTHFR genes. I again had troubles with bleeding so we tried Progesterone but it didn't work. We thought I wasn't ovulating but then found out I was pregnant AGAIN at my next appointment to figure out what to do next. I had a natural miscarriage the very next night.

It's now been 3 normal cycles and I would like to try again. I take extra folic acid now along with my prenatals. My Dr. says if I get pregnant he will have me give myself injections to thin my blood. He says he doesn't see anything else wrong with me.

My question is, how much of my problem is probably caused by this defect? My Dr. says this last miscarriage happened simply because my body hadn't balanced out and was not ready to support another pregnancy. I can obviously get pregnant, so it's the development that seems to be the problem. I know that nobody can tell me what will happen, but I'd just like another opinion. I want to be hopeful but does it sound like I have another problem besides the defect? Or does it sound like my losses were just unfortunate events that weren't related?

I should also mention that I have PTSD (I do not take any medications) and during each of these pregnancies I had circumstances which caused me to get very emotional and stressed out. My Dr. says stress won't cause a miscarriage but I can't help wondering if it contributed.

I know these are probably very difficult questions to answer but I would very much appreciate some feedback. Thank you!
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