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Hypertension and Kidney Function - A Month Later
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An_206669 posted:
Hello again - I posted a month ago because I had gone to the doctor after being exhausted for months. A blood test indicated that my GFR was low at 45; my Potassium was elevated at 5.8 and my Creatinine was elevated at 1.4. Additionally but perhaps of no significance, my Vitamin D was low at 22 and my TSH was high at 4.88 (even though I'm slender.) We re-tested and the numbers were about the same.

Now it's a month later and I am having a 24-hour urine collection and a renal ultrasound this week.

Over the past month, my energy level has continued to decline and I am finding it very hard to do what I need to do in a day.

My blood pressure has been rising steadily and today at the doctor's office it was 150/100. My prior six readings over the past six weeks were 150/90 (last Tuesday), 145/90, 145/90, 140/90, 140/90, 130/80.

I am a 43 year old, 5'6", female who weighs 116 pounds (I was 125 pounds but have lost weight over the past three months for no apparent reason). I have always been slender but curvy and take very good care of myself. I eat a healthy diet but have a big appetite, no fast food or excessive sodium, I exercise, don't smoke or drink and don't use drugs.

I have not yet seen the nefrologist but will do so if these tests this week are indicative of anything renal.

The doctor said she is very concerned because my blood pressure (which has been taken at various times of day both at home and at the doc office - though the numbers above were what the doctor took) seems to be on an upswing and she believes the kidneys are the cause of this.

Any advice on what could be going on?

Thank you!
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Tikasiamese responded:
Hi Anon, you have come to the right place. After reading your posting. I am glad to hear that you will be going to get your ultrasound. With a Gfr of 45%, blood pressure readings of 130/90 - you have classic symptoms of beginning stages of Polycystic Kidney disease. I too went through the same things and same questions as you did in October. Your creatinine level is better than mine (1.7). I was 45% at the age of 43 yrs old too (my points went down 2% since october). You and I are at the same level of this disease process. My suggestion is to see your primary first, she/he might order a CT scan. DO NOT GET THE CONTRAST DYE! Its not good for our type of kidneys. We do not filter the same as a normal functioning kidney. I know someone who had all sorts of problems(after the contrast dye), psychologically and physically with his kidneys. You will probably be sent for tests, dr appts (urologist, oncologist(if needed)). It is a long road that we have to face when we first get diagnosed. I find myself having all sorts of emotions. I see the nephrologist for the 1st time at the end of the month so I don't have anything to tell you about what to expect with that. Its been a difficult year for me because I just go over breast cancer earlier in the year and now I am dealing with this. Like you, I am also thin, extremely active (walking, running, rollerblading). This disease comes in all forms and sizes. Its important to get tests done to see if the polycystic kidney disease spread to some organs (even at our stage). It can spread to all types of organs. Mine has spread to the spine and also have cysts in the back of my skull. We have to be careful of aneurysms in the head too. If you get a chance, please check out "dailystrength.com" to reach out for others with our disease. I am on there. Hope to hear back from you soon. Keep us posted as to how the ultrasound goes. I know I have been where you are, I am 44 - around the same age you were diagnosed (43)..I am here for you, do not worry. Polycystic Kidney disease is something that takes many years to progress, if it does. Not everyone will have renal failure. Our situations are different across the board. Check out PKDfoundation.org. They have a PKD talk coming up on June 13 at 8 pm EST. It should be really interesting.

If you need to vent - email me at jennbartus@roadrunner.com

Jen
Jennifer
 
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MrsCora01 responded:
Hi Anon.

The most important thing is that you are seeing a nephrologist - someone who specializes in kidney disorders. There are a myriad of kidney diseases out there, and which one it turns out to be (if you do, in fact have a problem) could take a while to diagnose.

Keep in mind that I am guessing here (we all are until the test results come in) but given the weight loss, imho I think you should be checked for diabetes. You can be thin and healthy and still get it and it could affect your bp and kidneys.

As has been stated already, don't allow any tests with contrast dye as it can damage your kidney.

Unfortunately too, things can be a vicious circle. High blood pressure can cause kidney damage, and damaged kidneys can cause high blood sugar. So you may not know which came first.

Best of luck and keep us posted. The good news is that many kidney conditions develop slowly and you most likely will have plenty of time to get settled emotionally and do whatever you need to do diet wise or whatever the doc says.

Cora


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