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2 month old baby boy with a bad kidney
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JusticesMommy posted:
My son is two months old, and we just found out that one of his kidneys is bad. He's been admitted to the hospital and they are doing a test tomorrow to check the function of his bad kidney and if it's too bad they are going to remove it. I have never known anyone with kidney problems before and I am terrified for my son. I am a new mom, and not sure what to do. I am looking for any information about this I can find. Is there anyone out there that has been through this with their child and can tell me what to expect. I would greatly appreciate any info I can get.
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John-SKPT responded:
I have no first-hand experience with this, so I hope that you get replies from those who have.

But if one kidney is functioning adequately, he should be OK in the long run. A fair number of people are born with only one kidney, and in almost all cases, the one will grow somewhat larger and accommodate the function of the one that is missing or lost.

There may be a few limitations, like caution with contact sports that could damage the remaining kidney, and regular medical checkups to catch any potential problems early, when there is plenty of time to treat them.

But there are a whole lot of folks in the world who lead normal lives with only one kidney.
 
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michellebellp72883 responded:
My son was born with a bad kidney(his left). We were terrified of what they would find. They eventually diagnosed him with what they called a multicystic kidney(they found this problem when i was 5 month preg). Normally the correct kidney will develop slightly larger to take place of the bad kidney. After months of test and check up(they had him on an antibiotic for the first 6 months, just to keep any urine infections at bay. My son has "passed"all the test. He is a perfectly healthy 2 year old now, as normal as any other child, just one less kidney. Check your family history, during all of this i found out my paternal grandmother only has one kidney.Its genetic, I've been told. The pediatric urologist told us he could play any sports that we felt comfortable with, that he has more of a chance damaging his brain in sports(not that we would want that) then his one good kidney. He eats, drinks anything that we give him there is no restrictions on his diet, like i said perfectly normal. Hope this helps you and think happy thought, I'll be thinking about your son. Good Luck!
 
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kwellman2012 responded:
my granddaughter has just been diagnosed with a bad kidney not working.she is only 3 weeks old they are putting her on antibiotics for 1 year then surgery. what is the cause of this and what is the surgery for?
 
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lucyhelper responded:
To all parents out there who have a child with kidney problems...I hope this helps you. I was born with what's called a renal anomaly, or basically a malformed kidney. It showed up when I was two years old, as I became very ill. This was in the early 1970s. My right kidney had formed what the doctors called a "mass" with an extra ureter tube connected to the bladder. This is genetic, come to find out. My maternal great-grandmother died from kidney poisoning and my maternal grandmother was born with one kidney. It skipped my mother and two older sisters and was passed on to me. They removed the mass on my kidney and most of the extra tube. I've been ok until lately. I've always drank water, so the younger the better to teach your child that drinking cool, clean water not only tastes so good but is good for you. Please keep in mind to also teach them to take care of their body, hence, their remaining kidney. Teach them the dangers of smoking, lack of water consumption, exercise, etc. that can affect kidney health later on in adulthood. Please keep current with their doctor if there are any problems. If you (or they, later in life) notice any changes in anything, such as fatigue, urine flow/color/frequency, etc., have them see their doctor. Staying healthy will help them in the future. Eat foods that promote good kidney function. That's the wonderful thing about the Internet is all this information is out there.
I am now trying to get in to see a kidney doctor-a Nephrologist. Almost four years ago I had an ultrasound for my gall bladder. The PA I saw back then failed to tell me I had a cyst on that abnormal kidney. Now it has grown and I have back pain. I will keep this post updated as to my condition, but that's why I say please make sure to teach your children-even as young adults it's also important to obtain copies of your medical records so you can catch something your doctor may not tell you. Please keep records of what they do for your child/children as far as this or any other condition goes, so they have it for future reference. My Mom didn't think to do that back in the 70s and I wish she had. Most hospitals and doctors offices only keep records for up to 20-25 years, after that, they are destroyed. I wish you all the best and remember; your child will be fine, promote good health and teach them to take good care of their bodies as they grow.
 
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lucyhelper responded:
By the way, I forgot to say I'm almost 40 now, so it's important to teach your kids to take care of themselves so by the time they're this age their kidneys will remain healthy.
 
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lucyhelper responded:
Sorry, correction-my maternal great-grandmother died of urine poisoning, not kidney poisoning...thought I'd correct that.


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