Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up
bilateral knee replacement
avatar
epwatchdog posted:
I was really pleased to find this site. Feedback from patients is extremely helpful. I had bilat surgery 10/17/2012. Spent 4 days in patient and then transferred to acute care facility for 10 days of rehab. My doctor, therapists, and nurses all say recovery/rehab "is different for everyone".After reading this site I do see some common threads that we all seem to have.
I have a burning/tingling sensation when I lay down in be to go to sleep. I actually started after about 3 to 4 weeks after surgery. I feels like a heating pad on high and I cannot sleep for 2-3 hours. Pain meds sometimes help bu not allthe time. I cannot count on a good nights sleep. I have been told it is nerves that have been stretched during the surgery. I am taking a progressively larger dose of Neurontin. Anyone else the same?
Reply
 
avatar
jeanneinct responded:
I do get that burning and sometimes a lightening bolt feeling on the side of my knee where the nerve was cut and is regenerating but it only lasts a minute or two and I take it as a positive, although uncomfortable sign that things are healing. I use a lot of the soft ice packs wrapped in a hand towel. Even when it's not really cold, just cool it still feels great on those hot and burning areas. I use a wedge under the covers of my bed at the foot to lift the sheets and blanket off my feet, It helps when there's no pressure forcing your toes in a downward position. I sometime sleep with my leg elevated if it's very swollen. Using anti-inflammatory pain medications like Advil or Aleve help a great deal rather than just a pain reliever. You get both properties with Aleve rather than only pain relief. The swelling goes down and gives you more flexibility and comfort. (without constipating properties)
 
avatar
epwatchdog replied to jeanneinct's response:
thanks for the reply. I don't get the lightening bolt but it seems that the neuronton has reduced/eliminated the burn. It is now 10 weeks since surgery. How long for you? I do use ibuprofen but am allergic to aleve. thanks for your input,
 
avatar
jeanneinct replied to epwatchdog's response:
My surgery was December 4th, it was 4 weeks this past Tuesday. I had a small setback and had an episode of atrial fibrillation that sent me back to the hospital the following week for 2 days and delayed my physical therapy. The heat and swelling is primarily on one side of my suture line is incredible. I try to keep it elevated and iced up as much as possible. Physical therapy has been extremely painful despite taking a Vicodin prior to therapy. The therapist tells me I'm doing extremely well but of course it doesn't feel that way to me.I want to get away from the Vicodin and only take Aleve as I've said or ES Tylenol. These blogs are great because they help us all understand what a long and slow process this is to recover from and that we really need to persevere and be patient.
 
avatar
epwatchdog replied to jeanneinct's response:
I am now 12 weeks post surgery.. The drug I am takigfor the burning sensation has stopped the burning. It is called neurontin. and I am taking 600mg 3 times a day. My knees are getting better as long as I do the therapy. I made a mistake and went into a hot tub, they swelled tremendously.
2 days ago II went to the driving range and hit balls. some post swelling but not painful. my swing is restricted but my therapist says with time and exercise I will be back to normal. ITs all about the physical therapy. I know it hurts but you have to do it.


Helpful Tips

TKR surgery and recovery
I had one knee done in March 2007, the other done in February 2009. I am 67 years old. I will tell you that I researched doctors before I ... More
Was this Helpful?
20 of 29 found this helpful

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Related Drug Reviews

  • Drug Name User Reviews

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For more information, visit the Duke Health Joint Replacement Center