Skip to content

    Announcements

    Exciting News for WebMD Members!

    We've been busy behind the scenes building new message boards for you. You'll have new and easier ways to find messages, connect with others, and share your stories.

    And, this will all be available on your smartphone or other mobile device!

    What Do You Need to Do?

    The message board you're used to will be closing in the coming weeks. While many of your boards will be making the move to our new home, your posts will not. Want to keep a discussion going? Save posts you want to continue (this includes your member profile story), so that you can re-post them in the new message boards.

    Keep an eye here and on your email inbox, we'll be back in touch soon to give you all the information you need!


    Yours in health,
    WebMD Message Boards Management

    Includes Expert Content
    tsh level
    avatar
    littletammy posted:
    what do they consider to be "normal" when we have lupus?
    Reply
     
    avatar
    lupylisa44 responded:
    Hi Little Tammy!

    Welcome to the lupus board!

    I believe that the normal TSH level is the same for both a person with lupus and a person without lupus. I know that my tests show that they are on the very edge of normal but I have been diagnosed with hypothyroidism nonetheless. I function best when I am on the high end of normal.

    Here is an article that may help you:

    http://thyroid.about.com/od/gettestedanddiagnosed/a/normaltshlevel.htm

    Lupylisa
     
    avatar
    littletammy replied to lupylisa44's response:
    THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THIS ARTICAL. MY LAST TEST WAS 1.49 AND I AM SO TIRED OF BEIENG TIRED. PLUS ALL THE OTHER COMPLICATIONS I HAVE. IT'S BEEN WELL OVER A YEAR SINCE MY TSH WAS TESTED SO MAYBE I WILL HAVE IT DONE AGAIN AS I HAVE TO HAVE MY LDL DONE AGAIN. JUST WISH MY HUSBAND WOULD UNDERSTAND HOW I FEEL WHEN I TELL HIM IT FEELS LIKE A MACK TRUCK RAN ME OVER.
     
    avatar
    KellyLane24 replied to lupylisa44's response:
    Hello,

    Sorry for resurrecting a 2 years-old thread, but I'm facing a similar issue and have seen conflicting opinions around the internet.

    Read the about.com article Lupylisa provided (thx btw) and this article http://www.healblog.net/what-is-a-normal-tsh-level who provides different values.

    I'm totally confused Can anyone help me and tell me the normal tsh levels?
     
    avatar
    R Swamy Venuturupalli, MD, FACR responded:
    In general 0.3 - 3.0. As far as I know, there is no separate normal level for patients with lupus. Rarely, have I come across a patient with "normal" TSH levels but abnormal thyroid function. However, it seems like there is a large and active community on the internet that propagates the notion that TSH by itself is not accurate in diagnosing thyroid dysfunction. This is not the mainstream view by any means.

    A brief explanation of the thyroid hormones is given below.

    The thyroid is a gland in your neck associated with your metabolism—the processes by which your body makes use of energy. Autoimmune thyroid disease can occur in people with lupus, as can other thyroid conditions. Usually, thyroid conditions cause the gland to release too much or too little hormone. Your doctor may order tests to detect the level of thyroid hormones in the blood, especially if you experience significant weight loss or gain, sweating, acute sensitivity to hot or cold, fatigue, or other symptoms. These tests can also help your doctor monitor the effectiveness of thyroid treatment. Tests for thyroid hormones are explained below in greater detail. Your doctor may request additional tests, such as tests for thyroid antibodies, to learn more about your condition.
    • Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH): Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is a hormone released by the pituitary gland that signals the thyroid to release its hormones (T3 and T4) when levels in the blood get low. Together, TSH, T3, and T4 are part of a negative feedback loop that keeps levels of thyroid hormones constant in the blood. Abnormal levels of TSH in the blood can suggest a problem with the pituitary gland, such as a tumor, but this is unlikely. More often, high or low TSH levels indicate problems with the thyroid gland. The thyroid may not be responding to stimulation by TSH, or it may be releasing too much T3 and T4. Underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) is more common in lupus, but overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism) can also occur. Both of these conditions can be dangerous if not properly treated.

    • T4 and T3: Thyroid hormone contains thyroxine (T4, 90%) and triidothyronine (T3, 10%). The primary role of these substances is to regulate your body's metabolism. Abnormal levels of thyroid hormone can indicate hypo- or hyperthyroidism.


    Coping
    With Lupus

    WebMD's Day2Night will help you develop personal coping strategies for living with lupus – at home,
    at work, or with family
    and friends.
    Visit Lupus Day2Night

    Helpful Tips

    StressExpert
    There is a big connection between stress and lupus. Although it doesn't actually cause lupus, it certainly exacerbates it. An article from ... More
    Was this Helpful?
    19 of 19 found this helpful

    Related Drug Reviews

    • Drug Name User Reviews

    Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

    FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.