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cilla1960 posted:
I'm 50 years and was told i'm in menopause. I haven't had my period for 1 whole year. recently my breasts were sore and tender and i've been having cramps. On Monday, May 9th, i got my period. I was told that when you don't get your period for a whole year, you've definitely reached that stage. On April 2010 was my last depo shot since my gyn dr. told me no more because of my age. so is it menopause, or is it the depo shot? I'm confused
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Mary Jane Minkin, MD responded:
Dear Cilla1960,
This is a confusing situation. Depo can last a long time; it takes 6 or 8 months to wear off, for some women (that being said, never rely on it for contraception for greater than 3 months-but it can take a while to wear off.) So if your last shot was in April 2010, it wouldn't have worn off till July, 2010 at the earliest. So it is truly not a year since you would have had any possibility of having a regular period. I would consider you perimenopausal-and now the bad news is that you have to reset your clock for another year, to then say you've gone a full year without a period. And although it's very unlikely that you'd get pregnant at this point, it is remotely possible-so I'd use some form of back up contraception, to be safe (like at least contraceptive gel or condoms).
Good luck,
Mary Jane
 
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cilla1960 replied to Mary Jane Minkin, MD's response:
thank you so much Dr. Minkin. now that my period came back, should i consider low dose birth control pills?
 
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Mary Jane Minkin, MD replied to cilla1960's response:
Dear Cilla1960,
That's another good question-a low dose pill would certainly be fine, as long as you are a good candidate (non smoker, basically in good medical health). I would think particularly if you are experiencing perimenopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes, or night sweats, it would work well for you.
If you are having no symptoms at all, then you just need to decide what you'd like to use contraceptively (although the pill is of course fine for that)
Good luck,
Mary Jane
 
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cilla1960 replied to Mary Jane Minkin, MD's response:
Thank you so much. i have type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, all controlled with medication. i don't smoke, would i still be considered a good candidate for low dose birth control?
 
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Mary Jane Minkin, MD replied to cilla1960's response:
Dear Cilla,
Thanks for the update. As long as your diabetes is under control and your blood pressure is under control, you would be considered a reasonable low dose pill candidate. Obviously, one would monitor your blood pressure and blood sugar, but as long as they were stable on the pill, you could continue with it.?
Good luck,
Mary Jane
 
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cilla1960 replied to Mary Jane Minkin, MD's response:
Thank you so much. can you name a few?
 
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Mary Jane Minkin, MD replied to cilla1960's response:
Dear Cilla,
There are many good low dose pills on the market. There are many pills with 20 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol and several different progestins: drospirenone, levonorgestrel, and norethindrone. There is even now a pill with 10 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone-the only problem with the super low dose pills is there may be a higher chance of getting breakthrough bleeding-but then you could always go up to a higher dose pill.
So just check in with your health care provider, and they can prescribe one of these for you.
Good luck.
Mary Jane


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