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Could I be in perimenopause at 31?
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TiffanyDotson posted:
Here are the things I have been experiencing in order from the most annoying to just 'eh':

Hot flashes for as long as I can remember, but have goot significantly worse/hotter/sweatier/more embarrassing over the last year or so.

Night sweats that just started within the last few months. They are gross, wet, messy, and disgustng! Also, uncomfortable enough to cause me to wake in the night.

Weight gain has been terrible! I changed my diet, and started going to the gym WITH a trainer, and I can't seem todrop more than 5 or so pounds...which seem to creep right back on if I miss one day of gym or have a slice of pizza.

Period is totally weird now. Used to be like clock work, but now it's off later each time. I aways had a very normal flow, but now it's super heavy days 1 and 2, extrememly light for the next few days.

I have been dealing with random bouts of nausea that can accompany or not accompany the hot flashes.

I have bee pregnant 7 times, with 5 of them being live births, so my body has already been through a lot. I do have hypothyroidism, but it has been controlled by medication for about three years now. I also take lithium, zoloft, and lorazapam for bipolar 1 disorder. And last, my mom had a complete hysterectomy at 28 for near non-stop bleeding. (Not sure what the actual cause, though.)

Finally, I am already a bit moody, but the PMS is really getting crazy. Depressive stages, random bouts of rage (which make it very difficult when you're trying to quit cussing).

I hadn't even considered perimenopause an option until my mother-in-law noticed my complaints and mentioned the possibility. So I am curious what you think. I know it's possible for me to just go through this early, but what do you think?

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sjb05151956 responded:
Those symptoms could be caused by any one or all of your medications. Some drug side effects can be serious so be sure to read the drug insert or check online for which ones should prompt a call to your doctor or pharmacist.

I believe lithium can affect the thyroid so it's important to be routinely tested for effectiveness of these meds which you may already be doing.

It's rare that a woman your age would be in perimenopause but it is a possibility. Since your periods are "totally weird" have you considered birth control pills to regulate them?
 
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Mary Jane Minkin, MD replied to sjb05151956's response:
All good points; I just want to echo one, and make a suggestion. Yes, lithium certainly can affect thyroid function, so it's good to check that out regularly, to make sure you are on a good dose. The other suggestion to discuss with your health care providers: of all the SSRIs, zoloft is the one that seems to have the odd side effect of causing hot flashes; so when I have a patient on zoloft who is complaining of hot flashes, I try to switch her to a different med; something like prozac seems to have less of an association with hot flashes, and could help them; another helpful medication often is celexa.
So those are a couple of thoughts,
Good luck,
Mary Jane


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