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    Swelling By My Vagina, Infection, or Worse? Scared To Death
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    myrtlewood1935 posted:
    I'm a 52 year old woman in peri-menopause. About two months ago, I had an apparently normal period, and I've been bleeding on and off ever since. Mostly very light spotting, often accompanied by some mucus. I did some research and discovered that menstruation often goes crazy during peri menopause. I had another period in January, but the spotting went on. Sometimes it gets a heavier after a bowel movement, or if I fart; but then it goes back to being almost inconsequential.
    However, I found a lump yesterday while showering, and washing myself "down there". I pressed on the lump, there was no pain, however, I had to finish my shower quickly and have a "number two."
    I have looked at this lump with the aid of a hand mirror and it is dark red, and seems to be located at the bottom of my vagina. It bled from the sides when I pressed on it, but the bleeding quickly stopped. I would have gone to my health care provider right away, but I am currently unemployed and struggling to pay a huge bill I recently got from the clinic. I know I should have this checked out immediately, but I am afraid, and embarrassed. The thought of a stranger looking at my "naughty bits" makes me actuely uncomfortable.
    Reply
     
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    myrtlewood1935 responded:
    UPDATE: The swelling shrunk quite a bit by my daubing on a triple anti biotic cream. But the swelling came back. Then I bathed the area in warm water and the swollen gland shrunk to normal size. But it's back again, almost as if its taunting me. I wonder if it could be an allergy, or a yeast infection. My vagina is disharging a larger amount of mucus, but there isn't any pain, itching, or foul odor. I have been shoverling snow due to two storms that came through this week, and both times the swelling felt a bit largr, like it was more irritated.
     
    avatar
    Mary Jane Minkin, MD replied to myrtlewood1935's response:
    Dear Myrlewood1935,
    I'm not sure exactly what to make of this. One thing I would suggest is to keep up your warm soaks to your labial area (the vulva)-sitting in a sitz bath is a good idea for just about everything. And I'd do it once, or even twice a day for a week or two. There are many glands around the opening to the vagina (known as Bartholins, Skene's, urethral glands, among others) which can get temporarily blocked up-and warm soaks are the best first approach. And as long as this shrinks up, it is unlikely to be anything bad. So keep up the warm soaks (just plain warm water, nothing in it)
    Good luck,
    Mary Jane


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    For more information, visit the North American Menopause Society website