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    Bioidenticals and is progesterone needed?
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    mollie12 posted:
    I started bio-identical hormones less than a week ago. I had a hysterectomy in 1995 and have never taken any hormones. All is taken at bedtime. Progesterone 100mg dissolving pill under tongue, Biest capsule (E3/E2) 0.25mg/1.5mg, and Testosterone vanishing cream 20 mg/ml (topi-click (22.5ml) applied to vaginal area.
    I have read on this site that Progesterone is usually not prescribed if you don't have a uterus. Does anyone know anything further about this?
    Reply
     
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    Anon_6061 responded:
    Yes, progesterone typically isn't prescribed if you don't have a uterus since the role of progesterone is to offset the proliferative effects of estrogen on the uterine lining. However, in women who've had a hysterectomy and have or had endometriosis, progesterone or a progestin is sometimes used to help keep the endo "suppressed."

    I'm curious if your ovaries were removed in 1995 and, if so, how you fared all these years without estrogen. I had a TAH/BSO and don't think I could have survived without estrogen.
     
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    mollie12 replied to Anon_6061's response:
    Well lately I have been curious about the same thing. I have never had any hot flashes or other symptoms that come along with no ovaries. I just remember my ob/gyn surgeon saying he took everything during the surgery to prevent any future complications such as cancer etc. At this point, I may need to get my records to find out for sure. I did have endometriosis in the years past.
     
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    Anon_6061 replied to mollie12's response:
    How old were you when you had the surgery? Interesting that you have no obvious symptoms - physical, emotional, cognitive. I have to wonder if you were left with some endo implants/lesions that gave you enough estrogen to keep symptoms at bay. What prompted you to start hormones recently?
     
    avatar
    mollie12 replied to Anon_6061's response:
    I was 40 when I had my surgery. I asked my dr. about the progesterone. He explained that progesterone in a combination with the other hormones give me the right balance related with my blood tests. I also have read on other sites that this is true for overall balance and well being. At this point, it really does not matter if I have an ovary or not as the blood tests showed my level of hormones. Also at age 58, I think any woman would have low levels. I reason I had my levels checked was my mood swings (which I have had for years), weight gain, fatigue, depression and overall physical well being.
    I have been on the hormones since Aug. 12. Guess I need to give it more time, but seems there are times I do feel better. However, my breast are really tender. Asked the dr. and he said it was probably the estrogen. Said to give it a little more time and it does not get better, I may need to reduce the estrogen to 3 days per week.
     
    avatar
    Anon_6061 replied to mollie12's response:
    If you've been estrogen deficient for awhile, the tender breasts are probably just your body reacting to this "surge" of estrogen even though biest is a weak form of estrogen (mostly estriol). Some women need to gradually add estrogen for that reason. I've read that estrogen makes the breasts more dense which can make them more sensitive. I don't know if P or T can cause sore breasts.


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