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What to do when everything has failed
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An_256948 posted:
I am 44 years old and started with peri menopause at 38 after a tubal ligation surgery. It has ruined my life. I have tried numerous dosages of bio identical hormones, a variety of prescriptions of traditional HRTs in combination of antidepressants. I exercise as regularly as possible (running, biking, yoga) when I am not curled into a ball with racing heart, palpitations, and crippling depression which last several days. I don't drink caffeine or alcohol. I have tried so many different herbal remedies and honestly it is just such a waste of money. I can only sleep if I take Benadryll and the cramps and breast tenderness now come when I don't have periods. I live in a nightmare. I have spent a small fortune in Dr's offices and the ER. My heart is apparently in great shape, thyroid is good, but yet nothing stops the horrendous racing heart. Apparently from everything I've read menopause can be managed with "small but consistent lifestyle changes" I continue to read that women shouldn't allow themselves to suffer to seek the assistance of a health care provider for relief of extreme symptoms. Herbal remedies can help women who prefer not to take the drastic measure of utilizing HTR. I am a woman who has done all of these things to a T but yet I am no longer able to function, hold a job because of the number of days a month I'm unable to get out if bed my heart races so intently, I cannot take care of my children many days. So apparently peri menopause DOES destroy a person's ability to function or have a meaningful purposeful life.
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Anon_6061 responded:
I feel for you! I also had a gyn procedure (hysterectomy) that has caused nothing but problems and has taken over my once happy life. The depression, rapid aging, and changes to my anatomy and figure (along with the back and hip pain it causes) have been the worst effects. I have not suffered with heart palps though, thank goodness!

Have you tried birth control pills? Those help a lot of women in perimenopause. And then after you go into menopause, you could go on HRT if you are still having symptoms.
 
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hatcheram replied to Anon_6061's response:
I currently take Activella which is an HRT and Wellbutrin. I 'm taking the lowest dose of Activella because my Doc is not wild about HTR's and the increased risk of cancer. At this point , sadly, I am not worried about cancer because I would prefer to at least feel some relief and have a life that has some purpose and meaning while I'm young. Isn't prolonged stress to the body and horrible depression laying down a groundwork for cancer as well ?!?!

I am very empathetic to your situation. It must be extremely difficult to deal with even the most basic tasks with hip and back pain. I can totally relate to dealing with a body that has dramatically changed. It is the worst.

I hope things improve for you dramatically so you can like yourself again!!!
 
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Anon_6061 replied to hatcheram's response:
Thank you for your kind words. The hidden (organ displacement) and visible (skeletal/figure) anatomical changes caused by hysterectomy are seldom discussed. The hormonal and sexual effects are the more widely acknowledged effects. It's been 8 years since my unwarranted hysterectomy and it still haunts me.

I am with you on the HRT. I will take quality of life any day over cancer risk. I know women who have been on combined (estrogen plus progestin) HRT for decades and have not gotten cancer. Read the studies to get the facts about the cancer risk and then advocate for what you feel is in your best interests of overall health. For me, estrogen cured my post-hysterectomy suicidal depression and has helped most of my other severe menopausal symptoms. And since I don't have ovaries, estrogen has medically documented benefits. I plan to take it for many years to come. I just wish it could restore my figure, my hair thickness, my youthful skin, and my sex drive. But sadly, I know that HRT cannot replace our organs or their normal intact function.

I wish you the best in finding something that gives you back your life - your joy and normalcy!


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