Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up
Iliac aneurism
avatar
chopperbobby posted:
I could find nothing specific to my question, so here I go in here.
I have a right iliac aneurism, and i am waiting for insurance approval for treatment.
I obtained the CT scan CD from the radiologist and I took a look. I have no idea what I was looking at, but I could see the bulge, and it scares me, but I'm assuming that there is no concern, because it has been seen by several doctors of differing specialties.
I have a screen shot of the scan page.
http://chopperbobby.com/iliac2.jpg
How concerned should I be? I will have surgery, but with all of the insurance red tape, I do not know when that will happen.
Bob Burns
Reply
 
avatar
sluggo45692 responded:
Simply put, an aneurism is a enlargement in a blood vessel. This could be caused by a lot of reasons, but the worry is that it breaks open. Most can be corrected, if found before the rupture. They are treated with surgery.

As for insurance, the doctor's office & hospital are usually the problem. If you have insurance, the doctor/hospitals are the one's who need to 1) give you the paperwork and information that you need to give to the insurance company, if that's how your coverage works or 2) their business office needs to make daily calls to the company for approval. The second option is usually how the doctors and insurance companies work. They can speak each others language.

If the doctors feel the surgery is an emergency, you'd be on the table already. A thin walled or leaking aneurism is not something you want to mess with. You can internally bleed to death in less than 10 minutes, even if your in a hospital.

You can check on this site or another to see a better definition and your treatment explainations. I hope you get the treatment you need.

Good Luck
 
avatar
chopperbobby replied to sluggo45692's response:
Simply put, an aneurism is a enlargement in a blood vessel. This could be caused by a lot of reasons, but the worry is that it breaks open. Most can be corrected, if found before the rupture. They are treated with surgery.
Thanks for the reply. As you can see in the link I posted in my question the aneurism can be seen.

As for insurance, the doctor's office & hospital are usually the problem. If you have insurance, the doctor/hospitals are the one's who need to 1) give you the paperwork and information that you need to give to the insurance company, if that's how your coverage works or 2) their business office needs to make daily calls to the company for approval. The second option is usually how the doctors and insurance companies work. They can speak each others language.
For each procedure any of my doctors order they have to get approval from my insurance. My original CT scan was not approved by the insurance company, so my doctor had to write an explanation as to why he wanted it, and they finally approved it two weeks later.


If the doctors feel the surgery is an emergency, you'd be on the table already. A thin walled or leaking aneurism is not something you want to mess with. You can internally bleed to death in less than 10 minutes, even if your in a hospital.
That is my way of thinking about it, but the scan image is still scary. I am sticking close to home until it's over.

You can check on this site or another to see a better definition and your treatment explainations. I hope you get the treatment you need.
The vascular doctor wants to treat it with a stent, but before that she wanted to check my general health which included seeing my cardiologist, and he did an EKG and a sonogram of my heart. In the process my family doctor saw something else, and I am being referred to a neurosurgeon. I don't know what that's about yet. I am 74 yo, and I am falling apart it seems.
Anyway, I appreciate your response.
Bob
 
avatar
sluggo45692 replied to chopperbobby's response:
That's not a suprise the vascular doctor wants a cardiac work up. You said your self, your 74 yo. I had a inner ear problem and my ENT doctor wanted a cardiac work up. I was 49 yo. It's better to be safe than dead.
I think the greatest evils are lawyers, politicians and insurance companies. You have to pay a lawyer to read what another lawyer wrote. You get nothing, but hot air and theft (they call it debt ceiling) from politicians. You get to give insurance companies money and hope you never have to use it. When you do they don't want to come through on what they said they would do.
I'm sorry your insurance company is so slow. I hope everything goes well for you. I know your doctors are trying and can help you, when some guy at a desk tells them, they can.

Good Luck
 
avatar
chopperbobby replied to sluggo45692's response:
That's not a suprise the vascular doctor wants a cardiac work up. You said your self, your 74 yo. I had a inner ear problem and my ENT doctor wanted a cardiac work up. I was 49 yo. It's better to be safe than dead.
I can see why the doctor would want to make sure that I am healthy enough for surgery. I have no problem with that.
I think the greatest evils are lawyers, politicians and insurance companies. You have to pay a lawyer to read what another lawyer wrote. You get nothing, but hot air and theft (they call it debt ceiling) from politicians. You get to give insurance companies money and hope you never have to use it. When you do they don't want to come through on what they said they would do.
Don't get me started about lawyers.
I'm sorry your insurance company is so slow. I hope everything goes well for you. I know your doctors are trying and can help you, when some guy at a desk tells them, they can.
During the course of my CT scans a suspected sheath tumor was found on my spine. The neurosurgeon wants me to have a MRI, but my insurance company has denied it, but I am going to fight it.

Good Luck
Thank you. And thanks for the reply.


Helpful Tips

Could it be a plantar's wart?
I'm a 62 year old male with a very sore, bruised feeling on the bottom of my left foot, in the heel actually, this just came up about 36 ... More
Was this Helpful?
0 of 1 found this helpful

Helpful Resources

Be the first to post a Resource!

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.