Skip to content

    Announcements

    Exciting News for WebMD Members!

    We've been busy behind the scenes building new message boards for you. You'll have new and easier ways to find messages, connect with others, and share your stories.

    And, this will all be available on your smartphone or other mobile device!

    What Do You Need to Do?

    The message board you're used to will be closing in the coming weeks. While many of your boards will be making the move to our new home, your posts will not. Want to keep a discussion going? Save posts you want to continue (this includes your member profile story), so that you can re-post them in the new message boards.

    Keep an eye here and on your email inbox, we'll be back in touch soon to give you all the information you need!


    Yours in health,
    WebMD Message Boards Management

    Includes Expert Content
    Migraines and Stuttering
    avatar
    An_205077 posted:
    My daughter has been suffering for a headache for a week. The dr. prescribed cephadyn which she took only 3 pills. She started stuttering and having severe head pain with tingling when she went to the er. They addmitted her and ran ct and mri. All results came back normal. The doctor today said that the stuttering was linked to migraine headaches, but I haven't been able to find any articles to this affect online. Does any one have any information on the relationship between migraine headaches and stuttering?
    Reply
     
    avatar
    carpetcrawler5 responded:
    only that that's one of the common symptoms. Why was she taking the Cephadyn?
     
    avatar
    DUKE MEDICINE
    Timothy Collins, MD responded:
    Stuttering is not linked to migraine. I've seen several patients with headache and stuttering, and the stuttering always turned out to be linked to the stress that was causing the migraine, rather than the headache itself.

    Cephadyn can cause cognitive side effects which could influence stuttering.

    As long as the MRI scan is normal, There is not much to worry about with the stuttering.

    You may want to have your daughter see a pediatric neurologist for more specific medications for her headache.
     
    avatar
    christinamzc replied to Timothy Collins, MD's response:
    Dr. Collins,

    I'd like to get your opinion on my situation then. I've suffered from migraines for nearly 10 years now. It has only been in the past 2 that the symptoms have become more neurological. In 2009, I had a migraine that presented like a stroke. I couldn't read or spell, and had a horrible, uncontrollable stutter. After numerous tests, my neurologist diagnosed the symptoms as "migraine phenomena." After about three weeks and on-going speech therapy, the stutter resolved itself and I returned to fluent speech. Fast forward multiple migraines and one more such episode later to today.

    On this past Valentine's Day, I woke up with a migraine. Several doses of my prescription medications and plenty of sleep helped to alleviate the pain and nausea. On Tuesday morning, in the middle of a sentence I began to stutter. I have been unable to stop since. I still have a level 4 headache on the pain scale and have seen both the speech therapist and my neurologist. At this point, I have vocal function. I can hum, voice random sounds, and cough. But I cannot vocalize words without stuttering. I get stuck on the first syllable and lose the rest of the thought. Also, when I stutter, my head shakes and bobs towards the left and my parents have noticed my left hand curls inward.

    I can communicate via whisper with no vocal use, but still notice trouble completing simple thought processes and recalling specific information. For example, two nights ago I needed help finding a word. I could define it and knew what it started with, but I could not come up with the word "mechanics" (as in writing mechanics).

    This is frustrating to say the least and more than a little scary. No one seems to know what's going on. Any thoughts?
     
    avatar
    carpetcrawler5 replied to christinamzc's response:
    Maybe it was a mild stroke.
     
    avatar
    ritawick replied to christinamzc's response:
    I know your post is 4 years old but I am experiencing the same stuttering after multiple migraines. Do you have any advice?
     
    avatar
    ritawick replied to ritawick's response:
    My stuttering/stammering lasted a total of 10 days and the my speech returned to normal
     
    avatar
    ritawick replied to ritawick's response:
    But after 6 days my stammer came back.
     
    avatar
    christinamzc replied to ritawick's response:
    See new post.
     
    avatar
    christinamzc responded:
    Hi...you may remember me from earlier posts. I'm the one with the Chronic Migraines presenting with a stutter.


    I'm writing to let you all know that stuttering or stammering CAN BE associated as a symptom of Migraines. How do I know? Because I'm just one example of proof.


    6 years ago, when I experienced my 5 month long migraine with a stutter, I finally got some help with Dr. Ninan Mathews (RIP). If you don't know who he was, look him up! He was a very well known and well respected pioneer of headache and migraine treatment and care. His treatment for my migraine was hospitalization for round the clock IV treatment of DHE, Magnesium, and some other stuff I don't remember. After 3 days, I was migraine free. Within 20 minutes, I was stutter free.


    Dr. Mathews admitted that it WAS possible for a migraine to cause speech disturbances just like it can cause trouble with eyesight and hearing. He attributed this to the fact that Migraines are close in nature to seizures, and that it all depends on what part of the brain the migraine is affecting. (Don't quote me here, guys. It has been 6 years.) I can tell you that I have experienced several other instances where I get a migraine, begin to stutter, and the stutter resolves itself when the migraine does.


    For those doctors and scientist who believe this is impossible, I remind you that once it was impossible for the earth to revolve around the sun, or to sail the globe without falling off the earth. The fact is, and any neurologist worth his or her salt will agree, that the brain is still a mystery. And that Migraines are a disease...not one that can be cured by a one-size-fits-all treatment because there are no one-size-fits-all symptoms. EVERY MIGRAINE SUFFERER IS DIFFERENT.


    For those like me who struggle with speech issues with their migraines, I advise you to push through the stuttering and focus on resolving the migraine. Hopefully, like me, your stutter will resolve, too.


    Helpful Tips

    Botox for Headaches FDA approvedExpert
    Many of you have heard that Botox (botulinum toxin) has been approved by the FDA for chronic daily headaches or migraines. Chronic daily ... More
    Was this Helpful?
    31 of 47 found this helpful

    Related Drug Reviews

    • Drug Name User Reviews

    Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

    FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

    For more information, visit the Duke Health Pain Disorders Center