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Marijuana for headaches
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An_205078 posted:


I am in a state where marijuana is legal for the treatment of pain. I have tried the strain 'white widow' for the treatment of headaches. I have had mixed success using this product. (It stopped the headache from hurting but I could still tell it was there). I was wondering if there are other legal users who have tried medical marijuana for the treatment of headaches?

--Michigan Patient
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carpetcrawler5 responded:
Did you mean white willow? Just wondering because some natural food stores have white willow which is the same ingredients as aspirin but in a natural form.

I have heard that if you smoke marijuana right when the migraine starts it could help, but I haven't tried it personally. I have also heard some people get worse headaches while smoking marijuana.
 
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DUKE MEDICINE
Timothy Collins, MD responded:
I've spoken to other patients who report using marijuana for headaches. It is not legal for medical use in North Carolina.

I've seen 2 difficulties with using marijuana for headaches. First is the variation in "dose" of the active THC. This makes a huge difference in how much pain is improved. Second, I've seen 3 patients who probably have rebound headaches from smoking significant amounts of marijuana every single day of the week. The headaches in these patients start when they wake up, and get worse until they smoke more marijuana.
 
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maysfran replied to Timothy Collins, MD's response:
I have also noticed 'rebound headaches'.


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