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    Random sharp pains
    avatar
    sgish04 posted:
    I'm a 28-year-old female with no medical history...just got info collected for life insurance, and everything is fine, from blood pressure to cholesterol. Lately I've been experiencing sharp pains that shoot through my left temple, but only last for 1-2 seconds. They're completely random, but painful. It's been going on for only two days. Is this a normal occurence, or should I see a doctor?
    Reply
     
    avatar
    ibshort3rd responded:
    I am a 48 year old male and have been having the exact same pain for a few days now also. It was only once a day but today it has happened a few times. I'd like to know if this is something serious as well!!
     
    avatar
    soccer1lover replied to ibshort3rd's response:
    have them too but im 14 and theyre in the back of my head and they hurt sooo much does anyone have an answer to this?
     
    avatar
    DUKE MEDICINE
    Timothy Collins, MD responded:
    These are usually called ice pick headaches, because they feel like you have been stabbing with an ice pick, and then they go away.

    There are a small number of papers published about this type of headache. They are generally considered "benign" meaning there is not serious disease associated with this headache.

    The few times I've tried to treat them with prevention medications haven't been very successful, and the patients (almost all) felt the side effects were worse than the headaches.

    If they keep up, talk with your doctor about them.
     
    avatar
    carpetcrawler5 responded:
    Also go and get your neck and spine checked out, you could have a pinched nerve.
     
    avatar
    melisham replied to Timothy Collins, MD's response:
    I have been having these pains for the last 9 years.I had a pretuitary mass removed thinking it was the cause.However it did not change.I get them in anny stressfull situation,if bending for short periods,squatting (upon standing).It has become something i am acustom to.It can come iover me at any given moment.It has always been on the right side and when they are severe effects my right eye (turns bloodshot red and tears flow from that 1 eye).I have tried many different avenues to get rid of the pain.It is very frustraiting at times.My doctor has no idea what causes the pain and quite frankly irritates me with his attitude.He seems to act like i am making this up as if he has no idea why I would have a pain like this.I am not imagining it and I am glad to see that I am not alone and that there is a name for it.I thought this would be the death of me honestly,that is how it feels,like each one could be the last time I take a breath. I wish there were a cure....


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