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Convulsions associated with migraines
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tiff23 posted:
This is kind of a long story. I've experienced migraines since I was ~16 years old. For the first 4 years that I experienced them, they were the typical migraine with sensitivity to light and sound and severe nausea, that was it. However, in the past two years, my migraines are now accompanied by dizziness, loss of balance, mild memory loss (which has become a constant change and is no longer solely associated with migraines, though it does get worse when I have them), slowed thinking, muscle weakness (I can't hold my head up, my limbs are almost completely flaccid, I slump over in a chair, sometimes it's less pronounced and I may have difficulty lifting things that I normally can lift with no problem), muscle spasms, and, if I don't take Excedrin immediately, full-body convulsions that can last for hours (almost like tonic-clonic seizures, but more robust and I don't lose consciousness). After the first month or so of these new developments I also started experiencing these symptoms, particularly the convulsions, in association with hunger, heat, or feeling very tired. Now I'm noticing that when I exercise my limbs eventually stop being able to move and it takes a great deal of effort to even simply walk. This doesn't happen every time I exercise, but it's happened on multiple occasions.
Has anyone else experienced symptoms like these? Any ideas as to what it may be? I spent a couple of weeks in 2 different hospitals and met with neurologists and psychologists and no one could figure out what was wrong.
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