Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up
Migraine condition
avatar
vdez127 posted:
My mother has chronic migraines that sometimes last for months. The pain originates from the back of her cranium and moves to her jaw and face. She often goes to sleep fine and wakes up with a migraine. This has been getting progressively worse for the last 20 years. She has seen every type of doctor imaginable and nobody has found anything. I know my mom isn't crazy and definitely isn't a liar, but nobody has ever had any idea what is wrong with her. I was wondering if anybody might know of something uncommon that could cause this.

At this point, I'm open to any ideas.
Reply
 
avatar
smith_brad responded:
It could be a c-spine issue, or some type of impinged nerve. My migraines take on a radically different form, but with the uniformity of the attacks' location and duration, that gives the really good chronic pain docs some good info to work with.

What sort of work-ups has she had? (MRIs, lumbar punctures, etc.) There are some high-powered pain clinics in the country, and a lot of the times the local resources (doctors who don't see more exotic cases) just are not equipped to treat some of the trickier patients among us.

The hardest thing is getting the skeptical look from a doctor just because you have a problem they simply haven't dealt with. Near-Persistent Daily Headache and Chronic Migraine in general is hard to treat for a lot of doctors. I'm sure she's been asked a million times if there was any head or neck trauma or if she's tried nerve blocks, etc.

There's a whole smorgasbord of things the doctors will slowly check off the list if you find a good one.


Helpful Tips

Supplements for headachesExpert
A lot of my patients ask about herbal supplements for headaches. There are very few studies of supplements for headaches, but there are ... More
Was this Helpful?
49 of 66 found this helpful

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Related Drug Reviews

  • Drug Name User Reviews

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For more information, visit the Duke Health Pain Disorders Center