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Two Months and No Answers
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frustrated42 posted:
Hi, I'm 42 years old and about 2 months ago I was rushed to the hospital with what appeared to be a stroke or a heart attack. MRI and EKG's showed that I am pretty healthy but overweight. Oh surprise. I can read a scale! However, just before I was loaded into the ambulance, my eyes rolled up into my head and I fought to keep from passing out. I have had slurred or stuttered speech, migraines and dizzy spells ever since and have been unable to return to work. I am speaking out of the side of my mouth and look like I had a stroke, with nothing showing up. I have suffered from several forms of migraines for over 20 years, since a head injury in my early 20's. I have been tentatively diagnosed with a Dissociative Disorder called Conversion Disorder, yet the pieces do not fit. I am not repressed and have a pretty decent social life with plenty of friends, I'm not low income, I am educated and I do not suffer from any mood or mental disorders that I am being treated for. And the symptoms of this disorder usually go away within days or weeks, with mine still going strong and every time I get a migraine they get worse. I do have a high stress job that is enough to kill an elephant, but I do know how to control anxiety and stress. Has anyone seen anything like this?
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nyheadache responded:
I would suggest asking your doctor for an intravenous infusion of magnesium. If he or she insists on doing a blood test first, you should insist on getting not a serum magnesium level but an RBC magnesium level. At the New York Headache Center we give these infusion to many patients, often with dramatic results. We've published many scientific articles showing that up to have of migraine sufferers are deficient in magnesium. You can try taking oral magnesium and it may help after a couple of weeks (sometimes days), but in 10-20% oral magnesium is not absorbed and they need an infusion. Conversion Disorder is extremely unlikely - you probably have sporadic form of hemiplegic migraine and to confirm that you can ask to have a PET scan, but insurance usually does not pay for it. Calcium channel blockers, such as verapamil are sometimes effective (magneisum is a natural calcium channel blocker).
Migralex Doc
 
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frustrated42 replied to nyheadache's response:
Thank you, at least it is something to work on.


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