Skip to content
Includes Expert Content
MRI - CHECK
avatar
ronniengel76 posted:
MRI yesterday...have appointment with neuro Monday for results. All my labs came back in normal ranges, but new primary care doctor believes me that something isn't right. After almost 3 years of seemingly random symptoms and 2 neuros saying they suspect MS, 6 months of waiting for insurance red-tape, I may be just a few days from an actual diagnosis. Oddly enough, I hope that the MRI showed something that will explain what is going on. I guess that is part me wanting to be able to say YES this is what is wrong, it is not in my head (well, ok technically it would be..lol)!

~~Ronni

FYI--I also found out that if you have any sort of insurance, none of the organizations will help out with the cost of diagnostic testing.
Reply
 
avatar
purpleecho responded:
ronnienge176
I went through the same thing. But it took me 12 years. I was have lots of problems of just falling down with out any sense of losing my legs. At times I could not talk write. Feeling tired like I could not do much, and when I did do anything I was down. My neuro worked so very hard. Done many test. With my first MRI back in 1999, they found 2 white spots on my Brain. Neuro said that he wanted to say that I had ms. But neuro said that he can not call it ms because the Board of Health say that it is they can not allow neuro to call it ms, because it had to be more than just 2 spots. They told my neuro that if it was 3 or more then it would be ms. Neuro just keep me on medication for pain of my jumping legs and the other pain I was in. My neuro also did 3 spinal taps on me and of course it did not show anything. I never ever want to have that done again..My insurance would pay for MRI every
3 1/2 years and everytime it always come back just with the 2 spots on the brain. My neuro was very upset because the Board of Health would not agree with him. I had another MRI in October 2010l and we went over the test in one week. Then my neuro was really upset for what he found on my MRI. The whole top of my Brain was covered with continual white spot. And their was 10 white spots on the lower part of the Brain. So I have not been told that I know have Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis. They have 4 different kinds of MS and my neuro told me that mine is the worst on to have. They have no medication that can cure it. I was told I had to get a hospital bed and finally got my power chair that took over 1 year. I was even told to get my will made out as soon as possible. But I am only 55. So I have went through a very rough 12 years to get this done. My neuro did everything he could do, but they have to go by the Board of Health, when the Doctors have so much experience.
So I did not want to give you my bad story, but I had same trouble with insurance at first, but they finally did not give any more problems. I really hope it does not take as long for you. I will put you in my prayers and will be thinking of you. Will contact you at times or if you want to contact me please feel free.

purpleecho
 
avatar
ronniengel76 replied to purpleecho's response:
Like my new doctor. She seems genuinely concerned. There were several small lesions in my brain. The neuro in Alabama was convinced I have MS, neuro here wants to start from scratch to ensure the proper diagnosis, as she said that not enough to support a diagnosis of anything, but there is definately something going on. So, more testing. MRI on spine is next, along with an EEG. More questions than answers still, but hopefully soon I will know what is going on.
 
avatar
Jeffrey A Rumbaugh, MD, PhD replied to ronniengel76's response:
Sometimes a multiple sclerosis diagnosis is quite straightforward. Other times it can be very challenging. There is no one test that can say definitely yes or definitely no, so the doctor has to take all the possible information and use his or her best judgement. That is the art and science of medicine. While we want to make an MS diagnosis and start treatment as quickly as possible to minimize the negative consequences of MS, this has to be balanced against the certainty of the diagnosis and the negative consequences of a misdiagnosis, being labelled with and treated for MS if you end up not having it, and perhaps not being treated for something that could have been treated a different way.


Featuring Experts

Neil S. Lava, MD, is the director of the multiple sclerosis clinic at Emory University in Atlanta. He has been treating multiple sclerosis patients si...More

Helpful Tips

the walking drug, ampyra
was diagnosedwith MS in 2000. my walking has been getting harder to do but i was still able to work. i recently had an exacerbation of my ... More
Was this Helpful?
52 of 63 found this helpful

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Related Drug Reviews

  • Drug Name User Reviews

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.