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New Genes Linked to MS - How does this affect you?
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Elizabeth_WebMD_Staff posted:
"We have moved from three [genes linked> in 2007 to 57 now," researcher Alasttair Compston, MD, PhD tells WebMD.

Majority of the New Genes Linked to Immune System, Pointing Disease Origins, Researchers Say

Do you think this new information and research pointing to an abnormal immune system response will affect your future treatment?

For additional reading, see the article published in Nature .

Elizabeth
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swampster1952 responded:
Elizabeth,

Of course this "discovery" could lead to changes in future treatment for MS patients.

Any advancement in knowledge pertaining to MS and what may be causing it to occur can only help in finding more effficacious treatment.

Dave
 
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Jeffrey A Rumbaugh, MD, PhD replied to swampster1952's response:
The future of medicine (MS and otherwise) is personalized medicine. Someday when you are diagnosed with MS, your doctor will send an "MS genetic profile" blood test, and your pattern of MS-related genes will be reported back, and then you will be put on a treatment that is known to be particularly effective with your gene pattern (and not necessarily effective with other gene patterns). There is no one "MS gene". But there are many many genes that can each contribute a small amount to increasing (or decreasing) your risk for the disease.


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