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MS lesions growing?
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BrookeTT posted:
Hi all!
I am new to this post even though I was dx'd in 2007. I have been on Copaxone (anaphylactic) Avonex ( showing same symptoms) and now Tysabri. I just had an MRI done for my 6 month check up, and it showed " Focal increased T2/FLAIR signal is noted involving the anterior left frontal subcortical white matter as well as the paramedian mid left frontal pericallosal white matter for a total of 2 lesions. No evidence of associated enhancement is seen. The larger mid left frontal pericallosal lesion demonstrates decreased T1 signal consistent focal volume loss.
What does this mean? My neuro and his FNP told me that my 2 lesions grew. If someone could tell me what this means in real person terms that would be great.
Thanks!!
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Neil S Lava, MD responded:
The report does not talk about increasing in size of the lesions. Perhaps your neurologist was comparing this MRI with the previous one. The focal volume loss reflects damage to the nerve cells in that area. If I am reading this correctly, you only have 2 lesions in your brain.
Although the MRI is very important. How you function clinically and how many attacks you have is also very important.
I think you need to discuss your concerns with your neurologist and get a better understanding of what your neurologist is thinking.


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