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MS and Clomid
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Wendisue posted:
I am looking for research and articles on the negative effects of Clomid on an individual that has MS. Please if anyone knows where I can look or any doctors i can call . Please pass this information along to me.

Below is an example of my struggles with inferility and MS. This letter was written to my inferility doctor with no response. Would love some back up that supports the clomid and MS connection.

Dr,

I started my journey at your facility in 2008 with .......... The third IUI was successful and I had my daughter Alice on September 10, 2009. I was blessed.

It was six months after my daughter's birth that I tried for another child. However, I returned to your facility a changed person. In the fifth month of my pregnancy I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis after an attack of Optic Neuritis.

I am writing this letter to you and your staff to have my thoughts and concerns finally heard. I put myself in the care of Long Island IVF thinking I was getting the best medical advice and care for achieving the final goal of another child. In the end, I became the patient that fell between the cracks of your establishment because my doctor failed to look beyond the perimeters of standard procedures and ultimately grossly overlooked the obvious and my background health.

It came to my attention in June of 2012 when I scheduled an appointment with you that my files or "epic novel" as you stated did not include my diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis. It has since been added but far beyond the point of no return. I was also made aware that Long Island IVF currently does not have any patients with Multiple Sclerosis and have had very few within their history.

You as a doctor know the body functions in a delicate balance with all systems. If one aspect is compromised it can lead to other aspects. As your facility is not familiar with Multiple Sclerosis a call into my neurologist would have been a start. As I had pointed out on countless times that I struggled with my vitamin levels, especially Vitamin D (as low as 7) and Vitamin B12. Closer attention to my blood work and vitamins levels should have been a priority. A full blood count was taken once and that was before my IVF cycle in May of 2012. I even pointed out and asked how much Vitamin D should I be taking before my IUI and was given the answer that the prenatal care vitamins should be sufficient. Yes sufficient source for someone with out MS. Research should have been given to the effects of Multiple Sclerosis, as this was clearly new territory. It would also have been beneficial to know that people with Multiple Sclerosis suffer and have multiple relapses based on their Estrogen and Progesterone levels. The balance is crucial to healthy living. I was actually placed on Clomid for my first IUI cycles. I started to notice MS symptoms while on Clomid. I expressed my concerns. I remained on Clomid until I researched that Clomid is terrible for MS because they are anti-estrogen, thereby causing a drop in estrogen. The better choice to use is Follistim and Gonal. I went to the nurse practitioner Pat and requested the change. I began to take Follistim.

I know my age is another large factor if not perhaps the most important and I understand that element. I was 41 when I returned to your facility. My insurance did not cover IVF a cost that is overwhelming when first approached by the numbers. I was also concerned that I physically could not have multiple births. The initial attack actually happened to me while pregnant due to my Estrogen and Progesterone levels. The term selective reduction was made. A person that is not familiar in the world of infertility I was taken back wondering if in fact I was strong enough to make such that a decision if needed.

I did not need suggestions I needed guidance. I needed to be sat down and talked to about my choices. Not just the statics read to me of results of IVF with my age. I needed my doctor to take the time as a patient of over five years and speak candidly with me and give me the guidance I desperately needed as an individual not a statistic. I also should have been told there were grants available through New York State and been put on the list in 2009. I should have had some counseling and guidance on the active role of selective reduction. That indeed it is common and a very viable and non-threating option. After the third unsuccessful IUI I should have been sat down and told this is what you need to do, not as a number but as a person named Wendi.

I am deeply sadden that money from the State of New York grant was not issued to me in the last several months because I do meet the requirements of the state. However, I do not meet the requirements from your office. As you said a grant that is well sought after my many individuals. Yes, but what better individual to be awarded this grant than someone that has been mis represented by your office. Requirements of FSH levels are to the facilities discretion. It is enlightening to know that your facility holds the toughest standards on FSH levels and age than most facilities. In fact as you said you rarely even award the grant to individuals over 40. I find that very discriminating as the state has a cut off age of 44. This grant was a way to set things right from your facility. A chance to give me a higher dosage to create more follicles other than the low dosage of Follistim I was given in June and the possibility to freeze the remaining follicles if in fact the IVF was unsuccessful and look for a surrogate in Connecticut. A chance for life.

I ask you how could your facility take money for the countless IUI's from my insurance and money from my family when I paid out of pocket for an IVF cycle. Doctors should have taken the time to continue their research and thought about my Multiple Sclerosis as perhaps a factor with my infertility and gave me guidance. I finally suggest at your facility that the doctors sit down once a month and talk about their most difficult patients with unexplained infertility.

I am writing to educate you on some aspects of Multiple Sclerosis and the delicate human balance. I am writing for the future of your patients to be cared for with not only a doctor but a human hand as well.


With kind regards,



Wendi Mijal
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