Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up
Pedialyte and Usage
avatar
MomandMema posted:
HELP!!!!! My 18 yr. old step-daughter started giving her son Pedialyte before he was 1 month old. She feeds it to him like water (12-16 oz. a day) even though he is not dehydrated. She also never discussed it with the Ped's Dr. who she just saw this last week. Her son is now 2 months old. My husband and I feel she should not be giving it to him yet, but she says she is grown, he is her baby and that she does not need to listen to us. She also uses the same bottle and nipple for a few days in row without washing them. I am concerned about Thrush, but so far no visible signs. Someone please tell me what I should do or say to get her see things in a different light.
Reply
 
avatar
phoenix31674 responded:
Pedialyte does not have the nutrition to keep an infant healthy. An infant should be receiving formula or breast milk exclusively for at least the first 4 months, preferably first 6, unless directed otherwise by a doctor. Encourage her to take her baby to the doctor and discuss feeding, having your husband go if he will allow it since he's the biological grandparent. If she won't do it, for the safety of the baby there needs to be outside intervention to get her to see the folly of her ways. Given how pricey Pedialyte is, Formula is cheaper so I have no clue why she's doing this.
 
avatar
MomandMema replied to phoenix31674's response:
I feel for that baby as does my husband. She will not let him nor her mother whom she lives with attend any Dr.'s appt.'s. My husband tells her she's not right for what she is doing. She does give him his formula, but still only 4oz. at a time. He is hungry every 1 1/2 to 2 hours and she then complains about him getting to much. She lets him cry ALOT because she says she does not want to spoil him by holding him all the time. So much so he has already developed what looks like a hernia of the belly button. It is over an inch high. SAD SAD SAD.
 
avatar
sarah0323 replied to MomandMema's response:
I know this isn't what you originally asked about but does you step-daughter have PPD? That sounds alot like me when I had my first LO. I would just let her cry and cry because I couldn't deal with it. I would give people excuses because I didn't want them to know how bad I was actually doing.

You can always call Children & Family Services and ask for a wellfare check on the little one. It can be done anomously.
Sarah 32, SO 32, DD1 11, DS1 7, DS2 4, DS3 3, DD2 3 months
 
avatar
Anon_48326 replied to sarah0323's response:
I can't stand to know an infant is suffering like this. Intervention is absolutely necessary. If she won't listen to her own family, I agree with Sarah0323's suggestion that you report this to the appropriate authorities. This baby needs help!
 
avatar
ami_nix replied to MomandMema's response:
I'm so sorry that you're dealing with this. This situation makes me so mad! You can not hold a 1 month old too much! Not picking him up when he cries at that age is just teaching him that he cannot depend on his mother... I don't know too much about Pedialyte but, I know that my Pediatrician said that water isn't good for them at that age. My son has had some constipation and his Dr. said to give him a small amount of juice but, no other fluids besides formula. I agree with PP, if your step-daughter won't listen to reason, get that poor little guy some outside help! You're in my thoughts, your little Grandson is lucky to have you guys looking out for him
Noah's mom- "When you are a mother, you are never really alone in your thoughts. A mother always has to think twice, once for herself and once for her son." - Sophia Loren

 
avatar
Kay_And replied to ami_nix's response:
The first thing I thought of when you were describing your step-daughter was Post Partum Depression. Having to deal with a newborn is tough for everybody, even when you are a grown adult....an 18 year old (who is too stubborn or proud to ask for help) can probably be very overwhelmed and be more likely to develope PPD. I would really consider this as a reason for her behavior.

Pedialyte...there is no reason a healthy baby should be recieving pedialyte. Only if there is vomitting. My pediatrician even said that diarrhea (unless very very severe) should not be treated with pedialyte. My son had a stomach virus around 4 months and I had to take him to children's hospital, even with him vomitting every hour the pediactrian at Children's hospital said to continue formula because formula because that alone will help the dehydration...no need for pedialyte at that age.

And...I myself have gone a few feedings without washing a bottle, I will rinse it as soon as he is done eating...but I would never go days without washing. And you do not need to sterlize bottles anymore unless your baby gets sick.

If it is really bad and you think the baby's health is in danger I would try an intervention, you, her dad, and her mom sit her down and tell her together that she needs to step up and start taking care of her baby.
 
avatar
shelzzholmes replied to MomandMema's response:
ACTUALLY ma'am, 4 - 4 1/2 ounces IS what he/ she should be eating, and no its not because thebaby is still hungry, it's a lot to do with the way the baby is handling the baby food, he/she could be colicky, gassy, and such. My son is 6 months old, and eating 4 1/2 every 3 hours, i used to feed him 6 oz, BUT I was directed by 3 doctors that it was way too much for hisbelly size. ANYWAYS, also, a herniated belly button has nothing to do with parenting, my son has a herniated belly button, it's from the muscle in the belly not closing up after the umbilical cord heals. And if i was her, i wouldn't allow her in the room either, she is doing all the right things. Breathe.


Featuring Experts

Dr. Dan Brennan is a Board Certified Pediatrician and Certified Lactation Counselor. He is a graduate of UCLA, Albany Medical College and completed ...More

Helpful Tips

The What, When, How, and Why of Babies Sleeping Through the NightExpert
I absolutely love the discussions in this newborn community! I have noticed lots of discussions lately about sleep issues in babies that ... More
Was this Helpful?
19 of 25 found this helpful

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.