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The concern should be with regard to embolsim...not pain...
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grapenut posted:
Many of the previous posters are thinking it all boils down to if the vigorous burping causes pain; or if it could somehow result in shaken baby syndrome...please read on...
Most of us tend to grow up thinking we inhale a lung full of air, and the capillaries somehow magically absorb the needed oxygen, while simultaneously expelling unwanted carbon dioxide. The truth of the matter is that lung tissues/capillaries are so fragile and thin that the air exchange in the lungs is made possible by the slight differential pressure created during inhalation and exhalation. (note: when people are dying they will exhale through tightened lips in order to increase the resistance/differential pressure/oxygen exchange) When divers accidently hold their breath during ascent the differential pressure is so great that it literally forces excess air molecules into the blood stream; causing air bubbles in the blood which can cause all kinds of harm in the brain, and body...
This air embolism in the lungs is PAINLESS, so question we all should be asking; and the one I had hoped to find an answer to is: Is it possible that my wife's over zealous 'cupped hand' burping technique could be causing harm to our 3 month old's lungs or even causing an embolism; which would be almost impossible to diagnose in a 3 month old even if it were???
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