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    OVERACTIVE NEWBORNS AND CALORIE INTAKE
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    lisanicole84 posted:
    Our newborn was holding his head up the day he was born, and was able to roll over on his back within the first week and rolls over frequently. He doesn't sit still when I try to breastfeed him, and will kick and push himself away after multiple attempts to latch. once he latches, he falls asleep. this happens nearly every time we try feeding. He also lost 15 % of his body weight in leaving the hospital. I'm told by lactation I'm doing nothing wrong-but he is not getting enough from me. Is this because he will not sit still when we try breastfeeding? Or also that he moves so much he burns more calories than the typical newborn? I'm glad he is active and strong but feel he may require more attention and more calories.
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