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Post Surgery Tongue Problems? Freakin Out!
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Rob81x posted:
I just had cervical disc fusion surgery on Thursday....been a little over 4 days so far and still in a ton of pain, but recovering so it's hard to tell how successful it was just yet.

I have a couple questions I was hoping maybe someone could answer cause it's freakin me out.

1) The sore throat I was expecting, cause of the breathing tubes and all....but it's been over 4 days and I'm still having problems with my tongue. Best way to describe it is that it feels numb, although I know it's not cause I could feel it....and feels tingly. It's also very discolored, mainly whiteish, and looks kinda dehydrated I guess, although I've been drinking plenty of water. Is this normal and is there anything I could do to speed up the healing process? Is this just another thing caused by the breathing tubes like the sore throat? Or is this something I should be concerned about? I called the Dr. 2 days ago and spoke with his assistant since it was the weekend, and he made it sound like nothing to really worry about and just keep an eye on.

2) This concerns me a bit more....Tonight I just noticed I have a lump in my tongue, and yes I said in my tongue and not on it. It seems to be just to the right of the center front part of my tongue, and isn't really visible....but can easily be felt with my thumb and finger, or by gently biting down with my tongue. It feels like it's pea-sized and all the research I've done doesn't turn out good....last freakin thing I need now is a biopsy of the tongue lol....has anyone ever heard of something like this after a surgery or have any idea what it could be? Could it go away on it's own?

3) This is the least of my concerns, but figured I'd throw it in here since it was on topic....I've also noticed that I have little discolored spots (looks blackish) on the top portion of my front teeth. Any idea what this is from? Maybe a couple days I had to go without brushing? Should it go away on it's own?


I'd REALLY appreciate any help anyone might offer....I got so much on my plate I'm stressing myself to death!
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Zev Kaufman, DDS responded:
Dear Rob81x:
There are so many things happening with you that it is very difficult to keep the information straight. This all can be mostly post-surgical due to trauma to the tongue and the rest of the mouth from the intubation. However, it all sounds very unusuall and I can surely understand your concern. I hope that by now you are doing much better. However, I do advise that you go to your dentist and get checked out.. A physician is not used to looking at oral structures. A dentist is much better than that.
I cannot give you much more information, since I do not have a complete history and cannot examine you. Please go and see your dentist and keep your physician updated as well.
Best of luck,
Dr. Zev Kaufman
 
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Rob81x replied to Zev Kaufman, DDS's response:
Thanks Dr. Kaufman! I just saw my doctor for my post op follow up yesterday. He said it was an injury from the anesthesia. It seems to be getting better by the day, and the lump inside my tongue seems to be getting smaller, so we're optomistic that it's going through the healing process and won't be a big deal. I do have to keep an eye on it, and if it gets worse he's gonna send me to an ENT doctor.

Thanks again for the reply!


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