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*Ripped Gum*
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HollyKay1001 posted:
There was a little piece of my gum in the way back of my mouth it was stringy. So i ripped it off and now my mouth is sore on the one side.
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Gwen Cohen Brown, DDS, FAAOMP responded:
Hi HollyKay100,

Sorry to hear you have been having pain, hopefully you will be mending before you see my post.

There are a number of reasons to develop a bit of loose tissue in the mouth. Fortunately most are very minor. The number one reaso I see patient with peeling of the gingia is the result of direct contact to the affected area, this can be traumatic in origin like a pizza burn or chemical burn from tooth paste or mouthwash. For my patient population the toothpastes tend to be "organic" or "natural" and the mouthwash has a high alcohol content.

There are also a small number of skin conditions that can present with similar signs and symptoms associated with peeling of the gingiva when the oral mucosa is involved.

If the wound heals normally within a week barring other factors it should be an isolated incident. If the tissue does not heal or it appears to be growing or spreading I suggest that you see an oral surgeon to have a biopsy done. A biopsy will give you a specific diagnosis which will allow for appropriate treatment.

I hope this help!

Dr. Gwen Cohen Brown


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