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Uncontrollable shaking after tooth extraction
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wiserdays posted:
Three days ago I had my bottom back left molar extracted. I have had other molars extracted in the past with literally NO repurcussions. This extraction was difficult, took a lot more time than the previous ones and required two different kinds of novacaine to numb. Even with these injections, I could still feel a great deal of discomfort. At some point in the process a large muscle in my left thigh began to convulse and this continued on and off throughout the procedure.

After the extraction was over my entire body began to shake uncontrollably and I felt increasingly cold. These symptoms continued for several hours and I could not get warm no matter how many blankets I used. The shaking was severe and seemed to be eminating from the core of my body . . . I could feel the shaking internally as well as externally.

I was frightened by this experience and went back to the dentist's office. The entire staff seemed surprised by my symptoms and actually said they had never seen this before, which made it even more worrisome. They offered no solution or treatment and simply sent me home.

Does anyone have a clue what caused these symptoms? Is there anything the dentist/staff could have done to treat my symptoms?

I consider the entire experience to have been one of the more traumatic medical experiences I've had and now wish I had not had the tooth extracted, or had chosen a different dentist.
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Zev Kaufman, DDS responded:
Dear wiserdays:

The only explanation that I can think of is that some of the epinephrine (adrenaline) in the local anesthetic was inadvertently injected into a larger blood vessel, which can happen when a mandibular (lower) nerve block is given. This epinephrine can cause a fight or flight reaction in your body, which can cause a spasm of larger muscles.

I personally have never heard of anything like this happen, yet I could not rule it out. The good news is that these effects are very short lived and dissipate right away.

Best of luck and have a speedy recovery,
Dr. Zev Kaufman
 
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skimpson responded:
I have this same reaction too. I just had a tooth pulled yesterday.(but same reaction happens every time I go to dentist) Right away after getting shots, my heart rate speeds up. Then usually on my way home the shaking will start. Yesterday, I ran the heater full blast and thought I was doing good. I went to bed and woke up about an hour and half later shaking uncontrollably. I got up and blasted the furnace up to 90 degrees and stood on top of it until the coldness and shakiness subsided some. Ended up sleeping on my heating pad. When I woke up I was fine.
 
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julieohio responded:
I was having a root canal done and started shaking uncontrollably to the point the dentist said he could not finish it until i stopped which i couldnt it was the second to last bottom tooth on the left I have no idea if it was connected but i had a seizure 6 months later uncontrollable shakes and extremely cold i still never finished the root canal and ended up getting it pulled oh i forgot to mention he also broke his bit off in my tooth and said he couldnt get it out so it would have to be pulled and since it was a chewer i would need a bridge or implant great experience


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