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Coconut Oil- A Seemingly Adequate Temporary Remedy for Dry Socket
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An_253441 posted:
So I had an already protruding and infected wisdom tooth extracted 4 days ago (on a Wednesday). Yesterday evening I realized I'd developed a partial dry socket. I'd been very careful in trying to prevent one due to they're reputation of being 'extremely painful'. But alas, my efforts failed.
[br>Knowing that it was a weekend and my dental office is closed plus the fact that it's holiday weekend (Labor Day on Monday)I determined that I might not make it in to the dentist for another two days minimum. So I decided I needed to try something to prevent/lessen the pain associated with a dry socket. [br>[br>As soon as I realized I had a (partial) dry socket (I'd been visually checking everyday at least three times a day)I rinsed my mouth with salt water and brushed my teeth. Then I put organic, extra-virgin COCONUT OIL in the socket and wet a folded piece of paper towel and placed it over the socket. [br>[br>I kind of did this on a whim, being that I hadn't really read anything about anyone utilizing this temporary relief/treatment. But I love coconut oil and use if for a multitude of things (and always have it on hand). I know that it is soothing (non-irritating even on open wounds) and more importantly it has antibacterial and antiviral properties. So as far as my knowledge on coconut oil goes, it definitely seemed worth a shot. [br>[br>I went to sleep with the wet paper towel over the socket, hoping to keep it moist and prevent any more suction. I really expected to experience at least mild pain this morning. But so far, 12 hours later, I feel no pain or discomfort beyond what I felt yesterday before the dry socket happened. [br>[br>I swished more salt water and put more coconut oil in the socket again this morning followed by the placement of the wet, folded paper towel. I haven't eaten anything since however and I've only drank water. I'm trying to prevent as much debris and bacteria as I can from accessing the socket. [br>[br>On top of the soothing and antibacterial effects, the coconut oil seems to kind of help keep things lubricated I guess. I have also read that coconut oil is good for bone health so it just seems like an overall decent remedy at least until you can get to a dentist to be treated. [br>[br>I just wanted to share because I've read so many things about how excruciating dry sockets can be and I was starting to think I'd be doomed. I know I was expecting some degree of pain today but so far I am just fine. It's more than worth a try. I am no doctor or dentist but I really don't think it could hurt anything (unless of course you have coconut allergies!) [br>[br>I hope this helps someone! Namaste!




(I posted this on another website a few days ago. And since trying this remedy I have had very few and mild symptoms. I gargle with salt water and re-apply the coconut oil after every meal or snack. The few times I did begin to experience any discomfort (a very dull and hardly bothersome aching sensation) I applied the coconut oil and let it go to work. Surprisingly, the soothing effect was pretty immediate. I took one ibuprofen the first couple of times worried that discomfort would become agony, but it never seemed to progress far at all so I haven't even taken any pain relievers since. Just using coconut oil religiously and keeping the area as debris free as I can.)
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