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    Deformed fingers - what should I do?
    avatar
    heronsysnj posted:
    I've just been diagnosed with OA in my hands, and my right index finger is starting to bend at the top knuckle. Even if I can manage the pain, it looks horrible and makes me embarrassed to show in public.

    I haven't seen my Dr. yet, but my physical therapist said it was something akin to a bone spur. Name was "osteo-" something, I don't remember.

    If it's like a bone spur, can it be treated that way, with orthopedic surgery? Is there anything else I can do to straighten my finger back to the way it was?
    Reply
     
    avatar
    Lainey_WebMD_Staff responded:
    Hi Heronsysnj,

    Welcome to the community, I am sorry you are in pain and hope you find relief soon. This community can offer support and information. WebMD has some information about Hand Osteoarthritis .
    The article states:

    "The main goals of osteoarthritis treatment involve reducing or eliminating pain and/or restoring function and mobility. The following nonsurgical treatments may be used:

    Giving medications, including anti-inflammatory or analgesic drugs. This treatment might also include injections of pain reliever/steroid combinations.
    Using finger or wrist splints or soft sleeve devices during the night or during certain activities.
    Resting the joints.
    Using heat treatments such as paraffin baths or cold treatments when swelling is severe.
    Performing exercises given by your doctor.

    If the pain is too severe, or if movement becomes too limited, surgery may be needed. Types of surgery for treating hand osteoarthritis include:

    Joint fusion, in which the bones are fused together after arthritic bone is removed.
    Joint reconstruction, which involves replacing the joint surface that has deteriorated with a joint implant or with tissue such as tendons."

    I hope this helps, please feel free to post any more questions or join in on our discussions.


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