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    Strontium Warning
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    instituteforbetterbonehealth posted:
    All persons taking strontium supplements are warned that significant risks have been identified. Strontium drugs are not approved for treatment of osteoporosis in the United States. Now, the Risk Assessment Committee of the European Medicines Agency recommended that strontium should no longer be used to treat osteoporosis in Europe. The drugs Protelos/Osseor were specifically named as brand names for strontium ranelate.

    http://www.ema.europa.eu/docs/en_GB/document_library/Press_release/2014/01/WC500159375.pdf

    Strontium citrate is commonly used in over-the-counter bone health supplements in the United States. American consumers should be especially concerned because more strontium is taken into the body from strontium citrate than from a similar amount of Protelos/Osseor.
    The European Agency noted excessive numbers of serious heart problems (including heart attacks) along with blood clots or blockages of blood vessels.



    The report went on to state, "In addition, Protelos/Osseor is associated with a number of other risks, such as serious skin reactions, disturbances in consciousness, seizures (fits), liver inflammation and reduced number of blood cells."



    Numerous supplements contain strontium with the claim that strontium is "natural" because it is found in vegetables and foods that are consumed by humans. However, strontium is not required by the body for any normal function, and humans can be perfectly healthy without strontium. Note that heavy metals also may occur naturally in foods, but should not be consumed by humans. Now, it appears that strontium should join the list of substances that should be avoided for human consumption in amounts that affect bone health.



    Institute for Better Bone Health has more information on the risks of strontium at http://www.bonehealthnow.com/cms/QuestionableNutrientsInSupplements_70.aspx
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