Skip to content
Compression Fractures
avatar
megmo84 posted:
Hello,

I have osteo in the lumbar spine (T - 3.1) and am fortunate to have never sustained a fracture. That said, I am frustrated by the conflicting advice regarding safe exercises for those in my condition. For example - brisk walking is a favorite pastime. Is this okay, not okay?

Also, is it possible to restore height after a vertebral (morphologic) fracture has occurred?

As a new member to the community, I appreciate the support and expertise shared among you all.
Reply
 
avatar
bonebabe responded:
Walking is great. What you want to avoid is any forward bending at the waist (pivot from the hips instead) and any twisting of the spine.

No, once you have a compression fracture, it cannot be undone. We have patients who've lost 5-6" of height. It's not just the getting shorter that's a problem. When your spine is compressed, so are your internal organs. There is pain associated with this in addition to the obvious back pain. Your posture is stooped and your neck and shoulders ache from simply holding your head as upright as you can get it. Clothes don't fit. Eating is difficult because of the compression of the stomach.

Some people can wear a brace to keep themselves upright, but it doesn't restore height. Vertebroplasty can stabilize the bone, but not restore height.

I'd suggest you order the booklet "Boning up on Osteoporosis" from the National Osteoporosis Foundation (www.nof.org ) It costs $6.50 and gives you all kinds of info you can use.


Helpful Tips

Bisphosphonate use in premenopausal womenExpert
The potential benefits and risks of bisphosphonate use may be quite different in premenopausal women compared to postmenopausal women. ... More
Was this Helpful?
17 of 26 found this helpful

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Related Drug Reviews

  • Drug Name User Reviews

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For more information, visit the National Osteoporosis Foundation website