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my Calcium and exercise..
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momsygirl posted:
since being diagnosed with osteoporosis last June,ive been taking Calcium 600mgs per day but my Vit D is only 263 mgs..lately ive upped my vit D3 to 2000mgs-i found it in another supplement,im taking ..
ive read somewhere that we need atleast 300mgs of Vit d3 for the Calcium to work..im worried,that i dont get enough Vit D./.tho' i live in a place where its sunny everyday..
cant do my brisk walking anymore, since i have knee arthritis:((
i need another exercise ..what shall i do..thanks..have a goodday..
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bonebabe responded:
The current recommendations for calcium and Vit D are 1200 mg of calcium in diet and/or supplement and 800-1000 IU of Vit D. It's best to get as much of your calcium from diet that you can and supplement the rest. Remember too, that the body can only absorb about 500-600 mg of calcium.

As for the sun - it's our best choice for Vit D; however, you'd have to live in an area defined as below an imaginary line drawn between Columbia, SC and Los Angeles and be out in it every day in order for that to give you what you need. In addition, sad to say, once we pass age 50 or so, the body just doesn't make Vit D from the sun like it did when we were younger. Best to do as you're doing and take a supplement.

Knee arthritis is a pain in the butt in addition to a pain in the knee! I know, I have it too. You needn't do brisk walking to help your bones, Just walking and being on your feet helps. The exercise also helps the arthritis once you get warmed up.
 
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srw444 replied to bonebabe's response:
I am seeking guidance in my situation with osteopenia. My DEXA asssesment is as follows: The BMD measured at APSpine L1-L4 is 0.904 g/cm2 with a T-score of 2.3 (7/2012)
Indications: Breast Cancer, Chemotherapy, Family History of Fracture - femur, Menopause, No HRT, Post meopausal, Radiation, and Aromasin for 5 years (completed Feb/ 2011)
Prior DEXA 11/2008- T 2.0, Recent DEXA: 7/2012 -T 2.3
My oncologist wants me to go on IV Reclast immediately.
My endocrinologist wants me not to go on meds yet but do yoga and pilates and continue with 1,500 calcium and 2,500 Vit D3 which I have been religious about taking.
I have great concern after reading many posts on WebMD regarding the infusion of Reclast and the nightmares that "some" have had. I am familiar with infusions and once they are administered, there's no going back. For this reason, and the fact that I am very sensitive to drugs, I believe I prefer an oral med at maybe once a month. However, I really don't know what to do so I am writing you. I have valued your clarity in description and your balance in perspective. What are your suggestions ? Thank you, in advance.
 
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bonebabe replied to srw444's response:
You need a med and definitely DO NOT do pilates! Yoga can be modified for osteoorosis, but be sure your instructor knows your situation.

I understand your concern regarding an infusion. Your idea of a monthly medication is a sensible one. They all work the same way, so talk to your doctor. Maybe he can give you a sample for a month or so to see how you react.

You have a lot of risk factors for a fracture, and like an infusion, once you have one there's no going back and it doubles your chances of having another one.

Look at the nof website for a lot of info and FAQ regarding medications. www.nof.org
 
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srw444 replied to bonebabe's response:
Thank you so much for your guidance.
 
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srw444 replied to srw444's response:
I have read so many comments of people who seems so fearful and negative toward bisphosphonates. Which makes me fearful in return. (the downside to so much information available to us)
As you have been in this business for a long time, can you help me understand why these meds have such a reputation ? I realize any response you may give is sharing your observations but I feel that your input is very valuable.
Is it the side effects of the meds ? Is it that they don't have good outcomes ? Is it just fear ?
Thank you Bonebabe.
 
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momsygirl replied to srw444's response:
hi srw444 ,did you try to check www.nof.org ?
it was bonebae who sent me the link too../im there now with lots of friends,but i still come to WebMd..
Nof is a good site,you can learn a lot from that site,pls check it out ,ok?
hope you are having a goodweek..tc..
to bonebabe ..you are great..Godbless...
 
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bonebabe replied to srw444's response:
OK, here's my very own personal belief about the meds.

They work.

I believe there is a feeling of ill will against "Big Pharm" and that trickles down to negativity towards meds. Osteoporosis and resulting fractures sort of burst on the scene about 20 years ago as the Baby Boomers started to hit menopause. The drugs were developed to contend with the daily information we were getting about osteoporosis. Also people are living longer, therefore increasing their risk of fracture. When we didn't live so long, it was just thought that breaking bones, getting short or stooped was a natural part of aging. We know better now and have developed methods to counteract that.

The US practices Results Based Evidence in terms of approving medications. We know that the osteo drugs reduce your risk of fracture based on the extensive testing the FDA does. That's a good thing.

As with anything that you put in your body, some people will have side effects. In the case of Fosamax, et al, I believe the trial lawyers jumped on the bandwagon, seeing dollar signs, and recruited people who had suspicious problems. People came out of the woodwork with their "claims" to get a little of that money too.

Funny thing is - I've not heard a word about anyone getting any money from a class action suit - have you?

People fracture and people have bone death who are not on these drugs too, but you don't hear much about that. I guess it's not as interesting a story.

People who have allergies to seafood or strawberries or peanuts (all "natural" things we ingest) can die. There is risk everywhere. You have to weigh your odds of having a life altering fracture with the possible side effect of a medication.

Drugs save lives. My mom was on chemo for breast cancer. She was given a 2 in 5 chance of living 5 years. That was in 1992. Last year, at age 85, she went zip lining with me in Costa Rica. The chemo saved her life, but left her with a heart abnormality. Her choice to take the drug was a good one.

We have a patient we see annually who has to take prednisone in order to breathe. Wouldn't you? I think a no-brainer. However, it has depleted her bone mass. She doesn't hesitate to take Reclast. We make the best decisions we can with the information we have at the time. Sometimes we wish we could have a do-over and sometimes we high five at our smart choice.

Personally, I can tell you, if I had had a fracture or was in danger of having one, I would run to the nearest pharmacy with a script in my hand for a drug that could possible prevent that fracture. I've seen too many women who can't lift their grandchildren, can't have sex, fracture a rib when coughing, can't find clothes that fit (and when they do, can't dress themselves) are housebound and a drag on their friends, all because they let their fear of taking a med stop them from having as fulfilling a life as possible. I choose not to live that way.

Hope this helps you in some way.
 
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srw444 replied to bonebabe's response:
Your response helps greatly Bonbabe.
Cheers to your Mom for her survivor-ship of breast cancer AND zip lining : ) Awesome !
Thank you for taking so much time.
 
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srw444 replied to momsygirl's response:
Thanks momsygirl... I will check NOF now. Take care !
 
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momsygirl replied to bonebabe's response:
hi..
3 days agobonebabe your input here is just beautiful..thank you!you are welcome srw44!
 
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momsygirl replied to srw444's response:
hope you did already..)


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