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Addict having surgery...
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HeatherJYS posted:
Hello...I'll start by telling you my "addiction story"...I got sober back in 1995 after a DUI. I stayed sober for about 4 years and relapsed. I went into a program and stayed sober for 3 years. I relapsed again, on pain meds. I got clean almost 4 years ago. I need to have bunion surgery and I'm nervous I'll have to take narcotics. Isn't there something out there that relieves pain as well as narcotics but are not addicting? I'm also still taking Suboxone...the clinic I get my suboxone from said he thinks I'll have to take narcotics but that I'll "walk through it just fine"...I'm not so sure about that. Any comments?
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TDXSP08 responded:
You can take oral suboxone to fight narcotic addiction but it is also available as a transdermal patch to be used as a pain killer so maybe the Doctor is thinking of doing that with you??

but i am not a Doctor and don't know your case so i can only guess at what might be done.

Prace
i have no small step for man, but i have 6 tires for mankind,Watch your Toes!
 
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annette030 responded:
Excuse me, but isn't Suboxone addictive? Does it not at least cause dependence?

It is a mix of buprenorphine and naloxone, an opioid analgesic and an opioid antagonist. I have not used this drug myself, so I am not that familiar with it. Using it for opioid addiction is far different than using it for pain management.

I use methadone for pain management, and used to hand it out as a nurse in a methadone clinic for heroin addicts. Dosing and timing of doses is completely different. Suboxone is used for addiction treatment also, as you know, but buprenorphine is also used for pain management.

I would discuss this with a pain management specialist, an addiction specialist, and your surgeon long before your bunion surgery.

It is somewhat more complicated than one would think.

Take care, Annette
 
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annette030 replied to TDXSP08's response:
Don't forget, there is Suboxone, and Subutex, they are slightly but importantly different.

Take care, Annette
 
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Peter Abaci, MD responded:
Hi Heather,

One way to approach having elective surgery when you are taking Suboxone is to stop taking it a day or two before the surgery, transition to a low dose of an alternative opioid pain medication to avoid withdrawals, and then once the surgery takes place, use a stronger dose of the same pain medication to manage the pain for an appropriate period of time. In the case of bunion surgery, that might be for a week or so, and after that, your doctors can switch you back onto Suboxone.

This is what I typically recommend to our patients who are on Suboxone and need to have surgery, and it seems to work out well. The important thing is to have your plan in place before the surgery takes place, so you may need to coordinate things between your surgeon and the doctor who prescribes your Suboxone. Good luck!
 
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77grace responded:
Hi HeatherJYS,
I too am in recovery and also have had several surgeries!Also I have been on Suboxone ,I took it to help get me through withdrawels and also hoped it would help my pain so that I did'nt hae to go back on strong pain meds!For me I cut back the Suboxone for a few days and then I went back on my Pain meds1I would think your Dr.could do the same or something like this other Dr.said!If you do have to take Narcotics you could have someone close to keep them and only give you what you need daily!This has helped me too!
I also suggest that you turn it over and give it to GOD!
Take Care,77grace
 
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HeatherJYS replied to 77grace's response:
Thank you all for your replies. I'm not having the surgery, apparently, I have loose tendons in my feet and the bunion will come back within a few years of surgery. Thank you..


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