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What Is Your Best Tip?
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Caprice_WebMD_Staff posted:
We get newcomers looking in here all the time, relatively new to chronic pain, still trying to find answers, treatment and support.

What tips would you give to someone starting on this journey of living with chronic pain? What were some of the best suggestions you were told that really helped you?
We must let go of the life we have planned, so as to accept the one that is waiting for us.
~Joseph Campbell
Reply
 
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77grace responded:
Well,In the beginning it was terrible headaches!For yeas before the program I saturated myself with narcotics and valium,time passes and alot more of the same!!
Bottom line I had to have many years sober before I could take the kinda stuff I do !!That is due to #1 GOD,#2 The program,and so on.Now I definatly keep turning it over on a daily basis!One thing that has really helped me not to take too much,is to put out todays meds.in a Box,count it out!Then there is no question about more or forgetting and take one just in case! Blessings 77grace
 
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bren_bren responded:
Nobody has to know what types of prescription medications you are using treat pain; it's between you and your doctor.
 
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Anon_160307 replied to bren_bren's response:
Getting to the right level of medication balanced with other modalities such as exercise, diet, injections, physical therapy, massage, stretching, etc., takes T-I-M-E. I have been on the chronic pain train for over 12 years now and just NOW do I feel in control of my pain. To get to where you feel in control, you may have to switch doctors, go through various trials of trying various different meds and contending with the side effects of them. Enduring the side effects can have a very happy ending as many side effects dissipate on their own given time. So unless the side effects cause life threatening symptoms, give each medication a fair trial before throwing it away as it could be "the diamond in the rough". By a fair trial, I mean at least 1 month.

Know that not all epidural injections are created equal. I have had good injections and bad injections. So if the first one seems not to work, give a 2nd (and possibly a 3rd) one a try just as one would give oral medications a fair trial.

Understand that no matter what you do, the pain is still going to be there; however, with the right combo of meds, modalities, and depending on the type of chronic pain you have, it is possible to get the pain: 1. to be intermittent such that there are periods of the day that you are pain-free (or very close to it) and, 2. to have reduced intensity on a consistent basis.

Realize there are going to be things that you used to be able to do that can no longer be done. So begin to plan out other activities that can replace the ones you can no longer do that still provides fullfilment and purpose.

Joining a support group in the community and/or on the internet can be very helpful in getting you to accept your new life with chronic pain and can help you help others travel the same journey.
 
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Caprice_WebMD_Staff responded:
Really great tips, all of you. Thank you for taking the time to share what has helped you.
We must let go of the life we have planned, so as to accept the one that is waiting for us.
~Joseph Campbell
 
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lisDi replied to Anon_160307's response:
Thanks for taking the time to explain such helpful tips to people like myself who are new to chronic pain. I have RA and have just recently been diagnosed with cervical spondylosis and a herniated disc in my cervical spine. I feel like my life is over, because I have permanent damage now. I have to take vicodin on a daily basis for pain. I feel like a low life taking narcotics every day. I have a little part time job as a customer service rep in addition to receiving disability. I live alone in my little house with 3 dogs and 2 cats. I have decided that I have to concentrate on making the most of what I have. It is difficult to do. I am a survivor though and I will make it!!!
 
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Anon_160307 replied to lisDi's response:
Hi lisDi,

Don't ever give up hope! Know that there are so many out there that are struggling on a day to day basis trying to live as best as they can with chronic pain.

Going to pain management communities on the internet has helped me tremendously with acceptance. On good days, I respond to posts fruitfully to help others suffering . On bad days, I just read and it makes me feel better to know I am not alone. I know you live alone but you are not alone. You have a friend in me.

And do not feel ashamed about taking Vicodin. Opioids have been around for thousands of years, the pharamceutical companies have been unable to create a drug unappealing to the addict and that matches the pain killing power of the poppy plant and synthetic opioids derived from the poppy plant. Perhaps one day we will have something just as strong as opioids that is available over the counter because it has zero abuse potential like tylenol...but who really knows? So just because some abuse opioids, does not mean they aren't good medicines. Abusers have a psychological addiction disorder and their addictions are driven mentally versus being directly caused by a medication.

We are here for you to lend a ear whenever you need it. We understand.

Hugs (( ))
 
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dfromspencer responded:
The very first tip i would give would be, find a Dr., one specialized in pain mgmt., that you feel comfortable with. The second, be totally honest with him/her about your pain level, and the amount of relief you get from whatever has been prescribed. The third, do not abuse the medication, use it as prescribed, and if it don't work, tell the Dr., and work with them to switch to something else. Lastly, give each med a chance to work. Some take longer to feel relief than others.

Good luck, and less pain to all, Dennis
 
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TDXSP08 responded:
When Dealing with Chronic Pain you must remember every one is different a 10 for you could be a 3 for someone else so never try and compare pain. Also in order to get a Pain Management Doctor and build a trusting relationship remember TIME

Therapeutic Intervention - be willing to try PT,OT Meditation ,Biofeedback, TENS Whether they help your pain or not being willing to try things shows a Doctor you are in it for the long haul,people who just want drugs will run like scared cats they usually will not even attempt anything other than getting drug's if they can't do that they move on to the next Doctor.

Medication Exposure & Evaluation - that is when the doctor feels Medication will help your situation and will start you on a low dose of something & see you frequently to titrate the med until it helps control your pain and increases your quality of life or decides this is not the right Medication for you and try's a different one.

So when you see your very First Pain Doctor keep TIME on your mind and on your side and you will make a great impression on your new Doctor and because you are so ready and willing to work with S/he they will respond in kind,they never turn away a motivated patient.
i have no small step for man, but i have 6 tires for mankind,Watch your Toes!
 
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77grace replied to lisDi's response:
Hi lisDi,
Thank you for showing a positive part of you!!!I know how difficult it is dealing with chronic pain ,I have for over 30 yrs!!!
Sometimes I get down too,but I really try to not let myself feel sorry for myself!I have FEW friends that help ith that and now this site too!I read other peoples posts and it helps me get out of self!
Plese don't feel bad about having to take Vicodan everyday,its o.k.!Its not healthy to suffer either!!
You have gotten alot of really great replies,so take care!
I am here for you and everyone else too!
77grace


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