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Hip Pain
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Preshy posted:
Posting for hubby who's having severe hip pain. It's been progressing the last few years but it went from 0-60 in about 4 days last month. He's been to the dr. twice and has been prescribed codeine, naproxen and is now on diazepam as well. He has been diagnosed with osteoarthritis but after an exam with the dr. was told it was NOT his hip joint, that it was a nerve being pinched. The pain is extremely uncomfortable and unbearable at different times. We don't know what makes it worse some days. This is my first posting so any info would be welcome. Thanks in advance.
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ctbeth responded:
Hi from Connecticut,

It would seem that your husband's MD needs to know what's going on with his condition.

He can, then, consider the options discussed with his MD.

Good luck,

CTB
 
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_swank_ responded:
What kind of doctor did he see? If it wasn't an orthopedic doctor then he needs to see one next. Pain in that area can be hard to diagnose but doing nothing won't help.
 
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Preshy replied to _swank_'s response:
Thanks. Yes, he's seen our PC doc twice and was given an exam and prescribed drugs which have helped minimally. I looked up symptoms and have now made an appt with an orthopedist who will now take x-rays which the regular doc did not do. He will be seen on Monday. I am so glad we have a PPO, so no referral was needed.

What kind of questions should we ask?

I don't like the way the doc has handled this case and btw: we have been wanting a new pc doc for a while now. Thanks for your responses.
 
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annette030 replied to Preshy's response:
Best of luck to you both. Hip pain is difficult to diagnose, sometimes the problem is in the hip, sometimes it is in the spine.

My husband had a hip replacement surgery for post-traumatic AVN nearly 4 years ago. He adores his PCP. However, he is not honest with him about pain concerns, etc. He was waking me up at night every time he turned over with his screaming in pain before the surgery. (It was not the reason for the visit to the doctor.) I told the doctor about that myself, and still during the doctor's physical evaluation regarding the hip pain my husband told him the highest his pain ever got was a 2 out of 10. Six months later, we saw the doctor again for something else, again I told him my perception of what was going on with the hip pain. This time he xrayed the hip, the head of the femur was completely caved in. He showed us the xrays, and put my husband off of work. My husband was finally honest about the pain levels. After he finally had the surgery, things were much better as far as the hip went. He still is not honest about symptoms at times.

Sometimes it is not the doctor, sometimes it is the patient. Go with your sweetie, and sit and listen in the corner, if you haven't already. Tell the doctor your concerns if your sweetie doesn't come clean himself.

Take care, Annette
 
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Preshy replied to annette030's response:
Thank you, that is a definite aspect to this whole dilemma.I know he's being pretty honest now. But I will go with him to the doctor's to get as much info as I can.....
 
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ScUaRnVcIeVoR replied to Preshy's response:
Anette you should keep going with the more you learn and soak in the more you will understand in this world. I was 15 when I was diagnosed with leukemia at childrens hospital in wi. They saved my life anyways I don't kbow ifv anyone has done any cancer treatment where they had to put in like 1 8th of a syringe of vin cristine doubt thats spelled right any ways its suppoaed to be one of the most pain ful chemotherapy in exsistence my bones were on fire for three weeks out of the month. Also back would shake un controllably and instead I cried at the hospital at home 24 7. And ur probably why didnt they give u paib meds. Well they did from the start I got a 1000 not 100 pills of hydromorphone a month and it still didnt control it. Sorry I wanted to give u back round on my life. When the chemo finally stopped after 3.5 years. They weened me off everything and then I told my oncologist my lower back and my hips and both femurs hurt a little bit. So they did one mri and diagnosed with avn fron high dose steroids and chemo and radation . I told my oncologist that it didnt hurt like the chemo did but the pain is keeoing me fron thinking straight. They put me on oxycodone for break through, oxy contin for long acting, tizanidine for muscles and spasms also lyrica. This waa 5 years ago my pain is worse but my problems arent in spots where they can safetly due surgery. And if they fix that problem theres two or three other things gicing me pain.since then they switched too opana er and oxymorphone ir for breakthrough highly recommend the 4 meds I take for this stuff and I would suggest it to by my best friend. My real question is ive been diagnosed by three mri and I was past early stage so when am I going to get worse thats what scares me. I know another person commented they cant sleep with the pain from avn.I want she can survive ive been doing it for 21 years of getting a couple nights a week. Any advice would be grateful, I don't kniw how I accepted death at 15 was ready to go if god wanted me to and now im scared that if things get worse whats my quality of life going to be?
 
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ctbeth replied to ScUaRnVcIeVoR's response:
Hey Annette,
Did you catch this gem?

"Anette you should keep going with the more you learn and soak in the more you will understand in this world"

LOL! Yeah, good thing that we have "scancersurvior" to educate us RNs <3

Have you heard of a fifteen year old being kept in-patient for three years? I've been a nurse for a long time and I've not heard of anything like that.

I guess we've got ourselves a little mendax here, and a sanguinous one, at that!

I do love James Joyce <3


 
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An_249441 replied to ctbeth's response:
Wow, usually you're helpful but every once in awhile this other side comes out.
 
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Anon_596 replied to ctbeth's response:
Yep! It is late/early at 1AM. I need coffee to help get my mind moving. Or I'll understand it's just time to go to bed. lol

I don't think ScUaRnVcleFoR's response was meant as condesending, insulting, or derogatory towards annettte. I read it as she was encouraging the accompaniment with her husband to the dr's appts. There have been times when I, a common person, has enlightened my nurse or dr of things that just aren't in the forefront of their minds, sort of like the ego just got in the way type of thing that day for them, OR couldn've used another cup of joe too. lol
 
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ctbeth replied to Anon_596's response:
Annette has been a Registered Nurse for over-thirty years.

A twenty-two year old is posting lots of things that are downright un-truthful.

Telling a long-term RN a comment such as the one posted, is not only condescending, it is rather comical.

Vincrisitne is given IV, and for ALL, acute lymphocytic leukemia) is administered once-a- week.

Other than starting an IV, which is usually not the case, as most chemo patients have direct access via a port-a cath or C-line, Vincristine administration is painless.

A fifteen-year-old child would not been kept in-patient for three years. It is just not done this way.

I have been an RN since I was twenty years of age. I graduated high school at seventeen and graduated a three-year RN program at age twenty. I am now forty-seven yr of age.

I interned, albeit briefly, in pediatric oncology one summer. I did not like the job, but took a grad school course on pediatric oncology whilst working on my masters degree.

One also does not get avascular necrosis from Vincristine; it can be an adverse reaction of long-term prednisone use.

Here you go:

http://www.drugs.com/pro/vincristine.html

Posing as an ALL survivor and presenting false information, perhaps for attention, is not appropriate on these sort of sites.

Presenting oneself as an authority and telling other members that they do not know about pain, as she is the know-all and be-all authority, may cause site members to stop participating. SCaNcErSuRvIvOr's behaviour should not be encouraged.

Perhaps you noticed that most of her discussions have zero replies.

Someone recently got arrested for posing as a lymphoma patient. Do you remember the "Cancer bride"? If not, you can Bing / Google search her. It's both sad and funny.

These type of mentally ill need psychiatric help, not further attention.

If she needs to present herself as a ALL survivor, she should read a few article and get her story straight, or at least get one-or-two of the facts right.
 
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ctbeth replied to An_249441's response:
I cannot deal with posers and scammers.
 
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An_249441 replied to ctbeth's response:
Perhaps just walking away is an option, rather than writing such a terribly insulting post.
 
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annette030 replied to ctbeth's response:
I did not really understand that first sentence that you quoted, so I did not bother to read the rest of the post, addressed to me.

The only folks I ever knew who stayed in the hospital that long were back in the days that you could not get a bed for a trached patient in a nursing home. That was a long time ago, they simply did not do vent care or trach care in nursing homes back then. Two comatose ladies were in a room together in an acute hospital, an elderly woman and a very young one. The elderly lady was finally transferred and passed away within days. The younger one was still there when I left and moved elsewhere.

My husband had AVN due to a fall and a cracked hip, in my humble opinion, the W/C folks said it was due to steroid use 25 years ago when he was treated for lymphoma. We had health insurance so we did not argue with them. He had hip replacement surgery and went back to work as a big truck mechanic.

I really do not care what this person thinks about me. I have learned to not waste my time on small things. I learned this during my son's third deployment into a war zone, some years ago.

I also like James Joyce.

Hugs, Annette


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