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Drug test for work. On Oxycodone, do they tell the employer ?
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sharongaye posted:
I am beginning a job as a nurse, being drug tested, have an Rx for my oxy, do they tell the employer what I'm taking or does the lab just tell them I failed? Or do I pass since I have an Rx? I've never had any issues with abuse of my meds, no Dr shopping, no change in pharmacies, never called the doc n said "the dog ate it", etc...
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ctbeth responded:
Hi Sharon,

Yes, of course you tell your prospective employer about your Rx when you go for a drug screen.

I would suspect that the lab tech who assists with the procedure will ask you about your Rx meds and OTC meds, and other substances.

You only have to tell the truth.

Best wishes, and congratulations on your new job.
 
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blessedladyptl responded:
Just be prepared to show them your rx bottle. And your employer may want your drs name, address, etc.
 
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_swank_ responded:
In my experience, you don't have to tell the tech anything. I have been told that if you test positive the person that analyzes the test will call you and ask if you have an Rx. Then they verify it with the pharmacy. Whether that info gets shared with your employer I don't know. I have taken drug screening tests 3-4 times. Sometimes pee tests, once they swabbed my mouth and another was a saliva test. Each time I had taken oxycodone a few hours before the test. Apparently it didn't even show up because I was never contacted.

The person doing the test didn't ask me anything and didn't ask to see my Rx.
 
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sharongaye replied to ctbeth's response:
Thank you ctbeth, I don't use street drugs, never had to have a drug test before. I'm on a narcotic pain medicine and that worries me because I know all about the stigma of being on this type of med. And I need this job so badly! I am all legit, have my bottles, no funny business here. Praying I don't get labeled as "one of them" lol
 
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sharongaye replied to blessedladyptl's response:
Thank you, I was hoping the employer wouldn't have to know. Stigma sux. But I'm all legit. Praying
 
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kelly1962 responded:
I was a working nurse on Oxycontin and my experience was no. I was completely upfront on all the meds I took and hired immediately. As long as you are honest about everything you take, you should have no problems. And I worked in a internal care, surgery, and post-surgical positions. Never once did I have a problem working on this medication and I knew nurses that were far more scary than me. LOL Good luck and God Bless in your endeavor
 
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ctbeth replied to _swank_'s response:
Hi Swank,

I should have said that my experience with drug testing is the urine test at my pain management MD's office.

The tech, in that situation, asked me which meds I have taken, what time I last took my prescribed meds, and if I have taken any other obligates, benzos, amphetamines, etc that are not prescribed for me.

In this case, the tech has my med profile from which to proceed. This is different, I have been lead to believe, that an occupational wide range screening.

My only experience with employment drug testing has been as a supervisory role in my job before my accident. It was a few years back and things may have changed since.

It was the hospital for which I worked policy not to immediately disqualify an applicant for having opiate positive urine results. This is for the reason that Sharon asked: as Medical professionals it is known that opiate therapy for treatment of chronic pain does not necessarily disqualify an applicant from employment

We looked positively at applicants who were upfront about their health conditions and how it may- or may NOT- have effect on the position for which hero she is seeking.

So, in response to pre- employment drug screen, I was incorrect and stand corrected.
 
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cweinbl responded:
Yes... on each of your questions. Yes, they will know. Yes, they will tell your employer that you failed. Yes, they will tell your employer which drug is in your system. No, you do not automatically "pass" since you have an Rx.


But, many employers will not hold it against you if you can display the Rx and the condition requiring it. As is the case with most of life, honesty is the best policy.
cweinbl
csw2@bex.net


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