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Post-stroke Burning Sensation
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MikeAls posted:
My aunt, who is in her 80s, had a stroke a number of years ago and has continued to have TIAs. She's actually in pretty good shape, lives alone and generally manages well. However, about 6 months ago she started experiencing a burning in her throat. Her doctor thought it was GERD and prescribed Nexium with no effect. Endoscopy showed no damage to mucus membranes
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Another family member suggested that it was anxiety and the doctor gave her Xanax which does not affect the burning but which at least allows her to sleep better when the burning is more severe.

The burning never completely goes away, just fades and then gets worse. She does find that eating popsicles provides some relief as do throat-numbing lozenges. To me this would seem to indicate that the problem really is physical and not due to anxiety which she really hasn't had any symptoms of.

I'm wondering if this could be due to Central Pain Syndrome resulting from the stroke or if that's reaching.

I don't live near her but I talk to her several times a week and she always asks if I know of anything else she can try. It's a shame that with as well as she's coped with the assorted problems all of us have as we age that this one issue is causing her so much distress.
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