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biting
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An_222992 posted:
Hi Everyone, I'm the proud mommy to almost 16 month old twin boys. For the most part they're great but one seems to bite the other occasionally. Sometimes it's in anger and other times it's when they're playing. His twin brother even sticks his finger in this mouth and the other one is happy to bite! Nothing in their home envirornment has changed. My husband and I don't argue, watch violent movies or anything like that. I have used simple commands to try to correct like "don't bite, it hurts Marcitos" and I remove him from the situation. My mother is their caretaker while I'm at work and she's even tried a 10 to 20 second "time out" sitting in his high chair. Nothing seems to stop it. Now the brother seems to want to bite him back and I don't want it to escalate into anything else. It also concerns me because they're both rather fair skinned and the bite marks don't break the skin, but it does cause him to cry and leaves marks for a few days. I'm very concerned can someone please share their experience with correcting this behavior?
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kfitz responded:
DD#1 did this too, but she would bite me. It happened right when her sister was born when she was about 12 months. I tried EVERYTHING! I tried the low toned voice telling her "No", I tired giving time-out for 1 minute, I tried crying when she did it to show her how bad it hurt me, I even resorted to biting her back (on her hand) before it actually worked. We don't have issues with her biting others anymore, just with her biting herself (on the hand) when she gets angry so the whole thing backfired on me. I feel terrible that she is now "punishing" herself and I talked to the pedi who said to not make a big deal about the behavior and she will "grow" out of it. We just ask her in a calm voice if it hurt and she says ,"Yes" then we suggest she not do it again. It is getting better now, but I wouldn't recommend the solution as it really didn't work in my case.
I think at 16 months they are ready for timeouts for 1 minute. I use the Supernanny's method and it seems to work on other things for DD#1.
 
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Ihgirl1066 replied to kfitz's response:
My son started biting at about 10 months old, he'll bite you and laugh, when you tell him no he does it again. One day when he was at my moms he was wearing his shirt that says watch out i bite and she read it and he crawled up to her and bit her in the leg. I found that ignoring it and putting him down when he does gets better results.
 
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h0peless151 replied to Ihgirl1066's response:
DS is 13 months old and biting too. He bites when he's happy, or when he's tired,or if he wants attention.I work, and my father in law watches him. He ignores him when he tries to do it to him, but at my house, I look him in the eye and tell him sternly no bite- ouch. Then I put him down or walk away, which usually results in him crying. A toy or some other distraction stops the crying. Hopefully he'll catch on.
 
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Anmar22 responded:
I'm glad I'm not the only one, My DD is 16 months and bites just to bite. If I have my shoes and socks off she'll just randomly come up to me and bite my big toe. She bites DH or my fingers as well. When she does it to me I tell her "no biting" my DH usually will just let her do it or will even stick his finger in her mouth and I tell him to stop I don't want her to think it's ok. I wasn't sure how to discipline or if she was old enough for times outs but I guess she is so maybe I'll try that.


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