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New Car Seat Guidelines
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Amy_n_Matt posted:
Has everyone seen the new car seat recommendations?!! Getting my kids to be relatively comfortable while rear-facing was tough enough waiting until 1 but 2?!!??? I can't imagine. I understand what the numbers indicate, but does anyone else picture inadvertant developmental issues occuring from forcing these children to fold up like pretzels for so long?? My kids already had their knees to their chests when they were one year old. I literally cannot think of a way I could have fit my children, especially my son, into that seat up to when he turned 2 last September. The "new" guidelines say carseats are being made with higher weight limits to help with this, but that's not my kids' issue!!!!!! Where are their legs supposed to go????
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cduffy responded:
my 1st post got lost...so...

Cross legged. We kept DD rear facing until she turned 2 and she's tall. She would either cross her legs or bend them up to her chest; sometimes she would sit with her legs splayed open over the sides like the splits. She has no "inadvertent developmental issues".

Better a broken leg (which I've read never happens) than a broken neck.
The Mom: 33. The Pixie: 9.28.08. The Dude: 5.13.10.
 
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leftcoastgirl responded:
I was kind of surprised that the guidelines were being called "new" since I was told to keep LO backward-facing as long as possible back when I was pregnant with her in 2008.

My LO is very tall, and our pedi said to try and make it to 18 months if we could. We ended up turning her forward at 17 months when her legs got so long that we literally couldn't buckle the seat with her facing backward. By about 18 months, she was beyond the maximum backward-facing height for her seat, anyway. She exceeded the weight max well before age 2 as well.

I think the answer is that seat manufacturers will start making seats that can accomodate bigger, taller toddlers. I think if we'd had a different seat, we could have kept my LO facing backward longer.
Me (34), DH (34), DD (2)
 
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lenono97 responded:
Glad to hear about these new recommendations. Our pedi has been recommending these guidelines every since LO was born. I fully support them, along with the new booster seat recommendations. If you have ever seen a car crash video where a LO was forward facing, it's scary!!
 
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jan21baby responded:
I see where youre coming from becuz my DS is a bigger kid and had his legs bent at 11 months! We changed him around just a few days shy of his 1st bday. I didnt like the fact that his legs were bent so much. Now he just turned 2 in Jan. and people think hes at the older part of 2..closer to 3. I personally couldnt imagine my ds back there with his legs up in his face or split apart. Could you imagine the damage of a rear end collision with your kids legs split open?? IDK call me crazy but thats scary. And yes forward facing is scary too. But lets face it a car accident with our child in the car is just scary..Period!!!
 
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eliguns841984 replied to jan21baby's response:
could you imagine the damage of a rear end collision with your kid facing forward and his head being thrust in front of him? Scarier than broken legs IMO. The spinal cord can become stretched out, causing permanent brain damage or even death. Broken legs will almost always heal without long-term effects. My DS is in the 95th percentile for height, and he will be 3 in July. He still sits rear-facing because his car seat allows rear facing up to 35lbs. He's currently 31lbs. If you adjust the seat properly, it should tilt a bit, allowing for a little more leg room. He just bends his knees a bit but if the car seat wouldn't tilt enough for that, he would sit cross-legged or whatever needed to be done. Yes, it's inconvenient and yes, it's probably not as comfortable for him. But I'm more concerned with his safety than what's comfortable and rear-facing is across the board accepted as the most safe position.
Noel (26) DH (31) J.T. born 7/23/08 Abram born 11/08/2010
 
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sarahann1978 replied to jan21baby's response:
Think about it though, rear end collisions don't have NEARLY the forces involved as a head on. In most rear end collisions both cars are traveling in the same direction unlike in a head on when the cars are in opposing directions. Yes, either scenario is scary, but a head on is much, much, much, much worse.

That being said I will be honest that I turned DS's seat when he was about 21 months old because DH turned the seat in his truck and so DS was unhappy in my car.

I think it comes down to this, for most people there will not be a car accident, so if you turn your seat earlier than two there probably won't be any consequences and you will not think twice about it and feel good about it. BUT, just think for a moment about if you did happen to be in an accident that permanently disabled or killed your child, would you be able to live with yourself knowing that you were advised to keep them rear facing, but turned them for your own personal reasons. That would be a hard thing for me to carry for the rest of my life.

To each there own, we all have to take the information we are given and make the best decisions for our own children.
Sarah (32), DH(30), DS (Jan. 09) sarahaburger.blogspot.com
 
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jlynnpaine replied to sarahann1978's response:
You said perfectly what I was thinking. I cannot imagine the horrible guilt a parent would feel if their child was injured or killed because they were FF.

We turned DD at 18 months and I felt and still feel so much guilt but her seat just did not fit safely RFing in our car once we had to raise the headrest due to her height. We tried scooting the front seats up further and it did not help. I plan to try to find a better convertible seat the next time around so we can RF for longer.


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