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2yr old with a sore throat
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Torey89 posted:

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My son is 2yrs of age and has a really sore throat. It's red swollen and the doctor said that it's filled with a lot of puss. He was tested for strep and it came back negative. She said it was just a virus. I don't know if I believe that. Is there a home remade for this???
  • Really just a virus
  • Throat Infection
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patrick78028 responded:
I did a little research for this, and it's a website maintained by the University of British Columbia. I have a 2 1/2 year old son, so i cacn understand the frustration.....I know it might sound trivial, but i work a second job as a computer technician, and you'd be amazed at the information and answers you can get just by typing in your question on google.com! This is a copy paste from a portion of the article presented relating to your child's issue....(learnpediatrics.com/body-systems/general-pediatrics/sore-throat-in-children-clinical-considerations-and-evaluation/)
I hope this helps

  • If the tests are negative, then the child's throat infection is likely caused by a virus and antibiotics are not indicated, unless a second bacterial infection has become established.
  • Viral infections of the throat usually improve in three to five days without treatment.
    Can you tell if a child's throat has a strep infection just by looking at it? "026 No!


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