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How to keep child in his own bed?
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tristaj90 posted:
I am posting here even though my son isn't 2 QUITE yet.. He'll turn 2 on the 27th (so about 1.5 weeks)...

The last 3 weeks he's been waking up in the middle of the night and then my husband will go get him and then just bring him into our bed. I suspect he's getting his 2 yr molars as well as the fact he's got a cough/runny nose so he's sick...

Well last week we converted his crib into a toddler bed and kept all doors shut except his room and our room. He has no access to any other rooms. The first night he fell asleep on our couch, we moved him to his bed and he woke up (we tried about 3 times to move him) and we were tired so we gave up and he slept with us. The 2nd night he actually slept in his bed. The 3rd night he slept in his bed and then we woke up to find he had crawled in on daddys side of our bed without waking either of us...the 4th night he stayed asleep when put to bed in his own bed and then stayed there all night. the 5th night he stayed alseep while in his own bed and then woke up in the middle of the night and walked to my side of our bed and almost seemed like he was going to sleep on the floor so I grabbed him and brought him into our bed. Last night he came into our room and my husband brought him onto our bed and I wasn't aware of it until much later in the night.

How do we get him to stay in his own bed? I don't really want to shut our bedroom door and I know it's a transition period for him. If we were to shut our door he'd scream and hit and cry and if we never opened the door I bet he'd be on the floor in front of our door, sleeping, if we ever walked out.

Any advice/tips?
Thank you!
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saisen responded:
My daughter started co-sleeping with my around the time she was 6mo old. her uncle (my then newborn brother) was in my care for almost a week and a half while my mother was in the ICU with heart failure after his birth. Adam slept in her crib in my room, and she slept with me. She's 2 1/2 now and mostly sleeping in her own bed I'd say... 90% of the time.

It's been a rough battle (her bed is in my room, so her access to me is hard to halt) I've found the more I call her "mommy's biggie girl" the more independant she's wanting to be and sleeping in her own bed (usually without much fuss). There's still times she has a bad dream, or wakes up upset and wants inbed with mommy but its usually after 6-7hours of sleeping in her own bed so I dont stress it.

You could always try that, put him in his bed and tell him how happy you are that "mommy's big boy" is sleeping in his bed and continue to call him your big man n such during the day and see how that sense of 'grown' up helps his independence. It seems to have worked well for me, but then again, I've got a 1ft walk from my bed to my daughter's so its not much hassle to take her back to her bed. >.>
 
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earleyml1012 responded:
Consistency! I can't stress how important it is to not give in. The first few nights will be rough but he'll learn soon that if he gets up, that you are just going to have to put him back into his bed. I'm going to suggest shutting your door that way you hear him trying to get into your room that way he doesn't sneak into bed or sleep on your floor. Don't allow one night for him to sleep in your bed and then expect him not to. You need to keep putting him back into his own bed. When my DD comes into our room, I remind her that it's still night night time and that she has to sleep in her own bed. I agree with the other poster about making it a huge deal that he's a big boy. Good luck and don't give in even if it means a few nights of less sleep.


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