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    Blocked Milk Duct
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    Hannah_and_Noahs_Mommy posted:
    I think i have one...my baby is 5 months old and is my 3rd baby, never ever had one so i am slightly unsure! My left breast on one half is very tender to touch...no redness or anything. When i try to express barely anything comes out, i can typically pump a few ounces quickly. So to me that sounds blocked...i am just not sure how to remedy it. My DS prefers the other one, when i lay him on this side he throws his head back so i guess he hasn't been emptying it enough and now it's blocked. Or could the tenderness be something else? I've tried a heating pad and then feeding him, but it still hurts, and it started last night, so just over 12 hours,

    Thanks
    Reply
     
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    kristinrayerootes responded:
    I think I have had a few of these in the last couple of months. The first time, I was afraid it was mastitis so I did some research on it and determined I probably really only had a blocked duct. I just make sure to have her eat on that side a lot and pump to help. I also try to massage it to "unblock" it. The pain and tenderness always goes away within a day or two.
     
    avatar
    KimCurry5 responded:
    Massage, warm compresses, and nursing/pumping should help clear it out. If he doesn't like nursing on that side, maybe try a different hold, to see if he will nurse better.. He probably throws his head back because he's not getting milk because of the blocked duct.. Good Luck dear. The pain sucks, but grit your teeth and massage away. That will make it easier for your DS to nurse.
     
    avatar
    JimmyHooper responded:
    The great news is normally when you know you've got a lactose situation there are numerous strategies to live a standard lactose-free everyday life!

    According to the seriousness of your own signs, lactose intolerance usually can be handled through corrections to or even replacing with lactose free components of your diet program. Based on the patient's capacity to process lactose, these types of eating corrections will be as minimal as cutting down the total amount of lactose taken or perhaps can sometimes include replacing lactose free of cost products or perhaps lactose lower things for the hurtful components in your daily diet.
    Read More what is lactose intolerance?
    Men and women who still have signs and symptoms even though generating minimal adjustments on their diet plan can take over-the-counter medications. These types of products include lactase, the absent molecule which in turn causes lactose intolerance and even the distressing signs. This specific therapy might be obtained although ingesting your normal whole milk as well as dairy foods.


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